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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2006 23:20    Onderwerp: 22 Maart Reageer met quote

March 22

1915 Russians take Austrian garrison at Przemysl

After six months of battle, the Austrian garrison at Przemysl (now in Poland), the citadel guarding the northeastern-most point of the Austro-Hungarian empire, falls to the Russians on March 22, 1915.

During the first weeks of World War I in August 1914, Russia had been able to mobilize more quickly than the Central Powers had expected, sending two armies into East Prussia and four into the Austrian province of Galicia, along the northern slopes of the Carpathian Mountains (now southeast Poland and western Ukraine). In Galicia, two armies moved in from the east and two from the west, both steadily advancing through the region, scoring victories over inferior numbers of Austrian troops, including at Lemberg (now Lvov) in early September.

Franz Conrad von Hotzendorff, chief of the Austrian general staff, had set up headquarters in Przemysl in accordance with his growing conviction that Galicia was a crucial front in the war, and that Russia—not Serbia, as Austrian military commanders had originally intended—had become the Austrian army’s central opponent. Przemysl became a rallying point for the Austrians. As Conrad’s headquarters, the city had been given seven new defensive fortifications—consisting of trenches and barbed wire—and proved surprisingly resilient against the Russian onslaught. On September 16, 1914, its garrison was ordered to hold out until the end. Five days later, Russia’s 8th Army, commanded by A.A. Brusilov, began their siege. Austria’s 3rd Army fought forward and reinforced the garrison, where provisions soon began to dwindle among a growing number of troops. In mid-October, the Austrians managed to rebuild one of the nearby railway lines (previously destroyed by the Russians) and keep it open long enough to bring in supplies for the 130,000 soldiers—and 30,000 civilians—now in Przemysl.

The stalwart Austrian resistance at Przemysl tied up the Russian army, buying Austria-Hungary time to recoup its strength and slowing the Russians on their advance across the Carpathian Mountains toward the plains of Hungary. As the siege continued into the winter, neither side was prepared for the worsening conditions. Brusilov wrote of his army that they were “literally unclad. Their summer clothing was worn out…my men, up to their knees in snow and enduring the most severe frosts had not yet received their winter kit.” As for the men within Przemysl’s walls, they too were severely under-supplied and were forced to ration their food beginning in mid-November.

During the final days of battle at Przemysl, fierce blizzards raged, and hundreds of wounded men froze to death on the battlefield before they could be treated. As Alexander von Krobatin, Austria’s minister of war, wrote of the surrender, which finally took place on March 22, 1915: “the food supply grew daily more and more scanty, until on the morning of the 22nd there was not a particle of bread in the stores, not a pound of meat or flour available, so that the commander of the fortress decided to surrender.” Among the spoils of victory for the exhausted Russian forces were 700 heavy guns captured along with 120,000 Austrian solders (including nine generals).

By the end of March, then, Russia’s armies were poised to move into Hungary. The loss of Przemysl and the seeming weakness of their Austrian ally against the Russians disheartened the Germans, a mood tempered only by the British navy’s spectacular failure against the Turks at the Dardanelles that same month. As Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz wrote: “Everywhere the Russians are attacking ruthlessly and the Austrians are always beaten, and we too are getting nervous. Hindenburg is coming to the end of his resources.” Germany would now be forced to turn its attention and resources to shoring up its Austrian ally in the east. For his part, Conrad complained that his German allies had “won their victories at our expense; they have left us in the lurch.”

www.historychannel.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 17:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

T. E. Lawrence to D. G. Hogarth

Port Said, March 22 [1915]

Another uncensored letter: at half an hour's notice last week I send you a flood of stuff about Alex. Please try and push it through, for I think it is our only chance in face of a French Syria. I hope my letter was clear - because I dashed it off in such a sweat that I had no time to think of it at all.

This week is something else. You know India used to be in control of Arabia - and used to do it pretty badly, for they hadn't a man who knew Syria or Turkey, and they used to consider only the Gulf, and the preservation of peace in the Aden Hinterland. So they got tied into horrid knots with the Imam, who is a poisonous blighter at the best. Egypt (which is one Clayton, a very good man) got hold of the Idrisi family, who are the Senussi and Assyr together, as you know: and for some years we had a little agreement together. Then this war started, and India went on the old game of balancing the little powers there. I want to pull them all together, and to roll up Syria by way of the Hedjaz in the name of the Sherif. You know how big his repute is in Syria. This could be done by Idrisi only, so we drew out a beautiful alliance, giving him all he wanted: and India refused to sign. So we cursed them, and I think that Newcombe and myself are going down to Kunfida as his advisors. If Idrisi is anything like as good as we hope we can rush right up to Damascus, and biff the French out of all hope of Syria. It's a big game, and at last one worth playing. Of course India has no idea what we are playing at: if we can only get to Assyr we can do the rest - or have a try at it. So if I write and tell you that it's all right, and I'm off, you will know where for. Wouldn't you like to be on it? Though I don't give much for my insurance chances again. If only India will let us go. Won't the French be mad if we win through? Don't talk of it yet.

TEL.

Mooie site... http://www.telawrence.net/telawrencenet/contents_lists/years/1915_1916.htm

Aanvulling 2018:

T. E. Lawrence Society - 22 MARCH 1915

“I want to pull them all together, & to roll up Syria by way of the Hedjaz in the name of the Sherif. You know how big his repute is in Syria … Won’t the French be mad if we win through? Don’t talk of it yet.”

T. E. Lawrence to David Hogarth (The Letters of T. E. Lawrence, edited by David Garnett, published by Jonathan Cape, 1938).

A series of uncensored letters Lawrence wrote to Hogarth at this time reveal the strategy he was developing for the war. This letter of March 22 is picked out by David Garnett, the editor of his letters, as “probably the most remarkable document Lawrence ever wrote. It shows that he had already planned the campaign which he was to carry to a victorious conclusion three years later.”

http://www.telsociety.org.uk/22-march-1915/
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Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 22 Mrt 2018 8:34, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 17:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Bishop Charles McHugh and nationalist politics, 1914-1918.

The situation throughout Ulster remained tense. The Ulster Volunteers became more and more daring in their shows of strength and confrontation grew ever more likely. The gun running at Larne increased the alarm of Catholics in Ulster, the Curragh Mutiny in March 1914 also fuelled their fears. The Irish Volunteers had also grown in strength since 1913 and were especially active in Derry city, they wanted to demonstrate their presence and they called on their members to join a route march on Sunday 22 March in Derry.

When Redmond heard about this march he telegraphed McHugh asking him to stop it. This would be the second time in a month that McHugh was being asked to dampen, indeed prevent, nationalist protest. Redmond said that if the march went ahead it would play into Carson’s hands and be a “fatal mistake”. McHugh wired back that he would stop the march if he could. McHugh dispatched the Administrator of Saint Eugene’s Cathedral, Fr William McFeely, to the drilling grounds of the Irish volunteers. The administrator told them of Redmond’s telegram and pointed out possible negative consequences of the march. McFeely was confronted by the sight of 300 men drilling; they absolutely refused to change their minds about the march. They were however persuaded to change the route of the march to avoid protestant areas of the city. This was a conciliatory move and would lessen the possibility of violence. The Volunteers also offered to send a deputation to meet with McHugh. This deputation spent an hour and a half debating with the Bishop whether the march should go ahead or not. The Volunteers stood by their decision to hold the route march on 22 March but said that they would consult with the Volunteer body to get their opinion. McHugh at this point took the heavy handed step of threatening “to denounce the march from every altar in the city and the suburbs”.The Volunteers gave in and cancelled the march.

Interessant artikel op http://www.wths.netfirms.com/bishopmchugh.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 17:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sheffield City Battalion | Alphaeus Casey's Diary

Monday 22nd March 1915
Shooting at range. Government test. 25 yds, 5 shots, elementary target, grouping, a) lying, b) kneeling and a rest. Made 1 ins and 2 ins groups, top.
Sprained groin at footer.
Physical exercise 6.30-7.30am. Double round parade ground.
Afternoon distance judging from Lodge Lane. Groin got stiff and hurt.
Evening swotted Zo. Protozoa, e.g. Amoeba.

http://www.pals.org.uk/sheffield/casey_diary03.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 17:54    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Letters of Katherine Mansfield: Volume I

Monday night, March 22, 1915

To J. M. Murry

I am sitting writing to you by the light of a candil, with the whole house so quiet and closed and all the people in the cellars. The trumpets sounded about an hour ago. All the lights are out, except one on the bridge, very far, and one by the police station at the corner. I have been standing at the open window. Searchlights sweep the sky; they are very lovely, lighting up one by one the white clouds. Now and then some one passes, or a cart all dark gallops by. When the alarm sounded, the sirens and fire-whistles and motors all answered. I was in the street and in a moment or two it was almost pitch dark—just here and there a flicker as someone lighted a cigarette. When I arrived at the Quai aux Fleurs and saw all the people grouped in the doorways, and when people called out, “N'allez pas comme ça dans la rue!” I was really rather thrilled. The concierge, all the house, and an obscure little old man who is always on the scene on every occasion, asked me if I would ‘descendre’ but I hated the idea and I came up—of course all the gas was turned off—and hung out of the window. It was extremely terrifying suddenly; in fact (prosaic !) I was nearly sick! But after that the wonderful things happening, and especially a conversation between a man at a fifth floor window and a thin man on the Quai got me over my mal d'estomac. Those two men talking—their voices in the dark and the things they said—are unforgettable. Also a fool who came along the Quai whistling, his hands in his pockets, and as big drops of rain fell shouted with a laugh “Mais ils seront mouillés—ces canailles d'oiseaux!” The rain—the dark—the silence—the voices of the two men—the beauty of the river and the houses that seemed to be floating on the water … Ah, Jack!

As I wrote that more bugles sounded. Again I ran into the bedroom with the lamp and again opened the window. A big motor passed, a man in front blowing a trumpet. You heard from far and near the voices raised. “C'est fini?” “Fini, alors?” The few people in the street ran blindly after the motor and then stopped.

I went on the landing with my big rusty key to put on the gas again, because it's cold and I wanted a fire. The little man came up the stairs, and of course, I couldn't find the letter or the number, and of course he knew all about it. “Attendez, attendez! Voulez-vous aller voir si le gaz prend?” He was a far greater fool than I. But I mercied him bien and managed it myself.

These raids after all are not funny. They are extremely terrifying, and one feels such a horror of the whole idea of the thing. It seems so cruel and senseless. And then to glide out into the sky like that and hurl a bomb n'importe oú is diabolic and doesn't bear thinking about. (There go the trumpets again and the sirens and the whistles. Another scare! All over, again.) At B.'s this afternoon there arrived “du monde” including a very lovely young woman, married, and curious, blonde …(Oh God, it's all off again! I opened the shutters; the motors flew by sounding the alarm.) I can't talk about the tea-party to-night. At any rate, it isn't worth it really. It ended in a great row. I enjoyed it in a way, but B. was very impossible; she must have drunk nearly a bottle of brandy, and when at 9 o'clock I left and refused either to stay any longer or to spend the night here, she flared up in a fury and we parted for life again. It seems such utter rubbish in the face of all this—now. A very decent and pleasant man saw me home, happily. Otherwise I think I might have been sitting in a Y.M.C.A. until this moment; it was so very dark—but a lovely evening, very soft, with rain falling. B. makes me sad to-night. I didn't touch anything but soda-water, and so I really realised how the other people played on her drunkenness, and she was so … half-charming, and such an utter fool.

It is raining fast now, on the shutters, a sound I love to hear. England feels so far away at this moment—oh, very far….

http://www.nzetc.org/tm/scholarly/tei-Mur01Lett-t1-body-d1-d16.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 17:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1915 BATTLE OF GALLIPOLI TIMELINE (The Dardanelles Campaign Chronology)

22 March 1915 - Hamilton and de Robeck decide to make an amphibious landing on the Gallipoli peninsula.

http://www.ataturktoday.com/1915GallipoliCanakkale.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 18:17    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Zion Muleteers of Gallipoli (March 1915 - May 1916)

The origins of the Corps
In March 1915 the Zion Mule Corps became the first regular Jewish fighting force – with a distinctively Jewish emblem and flag - to take active part in a war since the defeat of the Bar Kochba Revolt 2000 years ago. Some of its men later formed the core of what was to become the modern Israeli army. General Sir Ian Hamilton, Commander-in-Chief of the Anglo-French Expeditionary Force in the Dardenelles, later wrote in his diary, ‘I have here, fighting under my orders, a purely Jewish unit - the Zion Mule Corps. As far as I know, this is the first time in the Christian era such a thing has happened. They have shown great courage taking supplies up to the line under heavy fire’ and proved ‘invaluable to us’.

The commander of the Zion Mule Corps, Lieutenant-Colonel John Henry Patterson, DSO, [iii] an elegant Boer War veteran of southern Irish Protestant origin, had been born in Dublin in 1867. He arrived in Egypt precisely when the British Commander in the area, General Sir John Maxwell, was looking for a suitable officer to raise and command a Jewish military unit to fight against the Turks in the Middle East. Patterson was knowledgeable about Jewish history and sympathetic to the Zionist cause, and as a young man had read all he could of Jewish military and religious history.(...)

On 22 March 1915 Patterson, backed by Godley, was appointed commander of the force he was to recruit, with Captain Trumpeldor as Second-in-Command. They left Cairo for Alexandria, where the Jewish refugees were living, to set up headquarters at 14 Rue Sesostris. With the help of leading members of the Jewish community, especially the Grand Rabbi Professor Raphael de la Pergola, he swore in the first 500 volunteers at Gabbari, just outside Alexandria, on 31 March. The Grand Rabbi officiated, with many other local dignitaries present, and an emotional telegram of encouragement was read out from Israel Zangwill, the British author and enthusiast for settling the Holy Land, who later described Patterson in the Jewish Chronicle of 28 August 1915 ‘as the soul of chivalry and gentleness’. The rabbi referred movingly to Patterson as a second Moses who would lead the Children of Israel from Egypt to the Promised Land and distributed a booklet listing British favours to Jews and bidding them to be good soldiers. It contained rules for behaviour towards officers and apt quotations from the Bible.

Mooi verhaal! http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/gallipoli.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 18:23    Onderwerp: Re: 22 Maart Reageer met quote

Yvonne @ 21 Mrt 2006 23:20 schreef:
March 22 1915 - Russians take Austrian garrison at Przemysl

March 22, 1915 - The Russians capture 120,000 Austrians at Przemysl in Galicia. This marks the culmination of a series of winter battles between the Austrians and Russians to secure the strategic Carpathian Mountain passes and opens the way for a Russian invasion of Hungary. Realizing this, the Germans and Austrians make plans to combine their troops and launch a major spring offensive.

http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/firstworldwar/index-1915.html

Maurice Paléologue- An Ambassador's Memoirs

Monday, March 22, 1915.
After an investment of four and a half months the fortress of Przemysl capitulated this morning.

From the strategical point of view the incident is of very slight importance, but morally it steadies Russian public opinion a little at an opportune moment.

http://www.alexanderpalace.org/mpmemoirs/9.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 18:26    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

THE MONTHLY DIARIES OF Lt RALPH. D. DOUGHTY. M.C.

Tel-el Kebir Camp Egypt
22nd March 1916
Hur-bloomin-ray. Marching orders at last, and as pleased as a cat with two tails to get them. Just awaiting orders to entrain. Am heartily sick of this confounded Country, however remarkable it may be. Too many flies and niggers for my especial palate and those two abortions combined are exactly 100% worse that Shrapnel or HE. This time I leave Egypt as a 'Bloomin OFFICER'. Lieutenant R.D.D. of the Galloping Ninth, 3rd Brigade, 1st Division. Our CO is Colonel Burgess, OC Major Gee, and Randall and Faulkner. My old chum C.G.P. is with the Brigade, as Orderly Officer to the Colonel. Am feeling awfully fit, so look out somebody!

Heerlijk geschreven... http://www.thekivellfamily.co.nz/family_pages/ralphs_diaries/monthly/04_march_16.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 18:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

22 March 1916, Lords Sitting

THE AIR SERVICE IN GALLIPOLI.


HL Deb 22 March 1916 vol 21 cc465-6 465

THE MARQUESS OF SLIGO My Lords, I rise to ask whether His Majesty's Government intend to publish in full the Despatches of Admiral de Robeck connected with the recent Gallipoli Expedition, including those portions dealing with the Royal Naval Air Service; and, if so, when.

THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE My Lords, the proceedings of the Royal Naval Air Service in Gallipoli were incidental to the naval and military operations and no separate Despatch in regard to them has been received or was to be 466 expected. I should wish, however, to take the opportunity of referring briefly to the work of the Royal Naval Air Service in Gallipoli. It is possibly not generally known that all air work throughout the Dardanelles Expedition fell on the Royal Naval Air Service. The military wing of the Royal Flying Corps was not represented, except in the person of Wing-Captain Sykes, who was lent to command the naval units. In the face of great and peculiar difficulties the Air Service carried out its varied duties much to the satisfaction both of the naval and military authorities. Publicity has been given to two or three special incidents where air pilots greatly distinguished themselves; but, in addition to this, the work of spotting and photographing was being constantly carried out with much skill and gallantry and gave most valuable results. The noble Marquess will find, on referring to the honours granted in the Gazette of March 14, that this work has not gone without recognition. I might, perhaps, add that in a recent letter the Vice-Admiral Commanding characterises the work of the Royal Naval Air Service in that area as having been admirable.

THE MARQUESS OF SLIGO I assume that it is considered inadvisable to publish the Despatches in full

THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE As a matter of fact, I do not believe there are any separate Despatches as such—at any rate no separate Despatches will be published.

THE MARQUESS OF SLIGO Would it be possible to publish those portions that refer to individuals? It would appear from the Gazette which was issued on the 14th instant that a certain number of officers and men have been specially mentioned for distinguished, meritorious, or skilful service, or even gallant conduct; and it would be gratifying to their relations and friends if such reference as is made to the officers and men concerned could be published.

THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE One set has been published from Sir Ian Hamilton, as my noble friend is aware. There will, I understand, be another set of Despatches published later, and no doubt due mention will be made of the work of the Air Service on that occasion.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/sittings/1916/mar/22
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 18:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS - 22 MARCH 1917

NZ OFFICERS ON ACTIVE SERVICE

BLACK, Lt Col A, CMG, who left NZ in command of the Auckland Battalion (main body) and has held that command ever since, has now been appointed Officer in Charge of the Divisional Physical Training. He is succeeded in the Auckland Battalion by Major S S ALLEN.

DICKSON, Flight Sub-Lieut E, RNAS, late of Thames, is stationed in Lincolnshire. A few weeks ago he had a remarkable escape. When descending in a Caritas bi-plane he was caught in a fog and couldn’t see the ground with the result that the machine crashed down but the airman escaped without personal injury. He went to Edinburgh for Christmas leave.

HANNA, Lieut S J of Auckland, who has spent the last 13 months with the British Armoured Cars in Russia, was in London this week. The first winter was spent in the ice bound region of the far north, largely on constructional work. When the thaw came, the cars went through to the Caucasus, a journey of 14 days, and took a valuable part in the expulsion of the Turks from the highlands of Erzerum and Trebizond. Then they came round the Caspian and Black Seas to Roumania and fought their valiant rear guard action throughout the retreat. Lt Hanna, who has been adjutant to the unit, has enjoyed the best of health throughout but had to return to England for a minor operation which has now been found unnecessary. Sub Lieutenant Clive HALL, another Aucklander, recently transferred from the NZEF, has also gone to Russia to join the Armoured Cars.

The death from wounds received in France of Major A G McNEILL, M.C., of the Royal Engineers, is reported. He was 33 years of age. He obtained his captaincy in the Royal Engineers just before the war. He was then employed with the Egyptian Army and when the NZ main body reached Egypt he was attached, with Major PRIDHAM, in the organisation of the NZ Engineers with whom he served throughout. He was given the temporary rank of Major last year and awarded the Military Cross in the Birthday Honours.

Veel meer op http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sooty/awn22mar1917.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 18:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Bernard James Glynn

Thursday, March 22, 1917 - Got back to Aerodome 12:30 PM. Mail from home & Ray. Did not go up flying. Feeling punk.

"Feeling punk."???? http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/remembers/sub.cfm?source=collections/diary/1diary/glynn/mar1917
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 18:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

22 March 1917, Commons Sitting

GERMAN FOREIGN POLICY.


HC Deb 22 March 1917 vol 91 cc2052-3 2052

Mr. SHAW asked the Prime Minister whether, towards the close of 1905 or in the early weeks of 1906, a Minute was-drawn up by Sir Eyre Crowe, of the-Foreign Office, in which the development and tendencies of German foreign policy 2053 were traced; whether that Minute touched upon the possibility of conflict between Great Britain and Germany; and whether, in view of the interest and importance of the subjects treated, he will cause a copy of the Minute to be laid upon the Table of the House?

Lord R. CECIL Yes, Sir; an extremely able Memorandum was drawn up by Sir E. Crowe and submitted to the Secretary of State on 1st January, 1907, dealing with German policy and the grave dangers with which it threatened this country. But I do not think it would be in the public interest to make a precedent for the publication of secret Departmental Memoranda by laying it on the Table. I say this with reluctance, because the publication of this very striking State Paper would set at rest for ever the baseless insinuations which have been made against the patriotism and character of one of the ablest of our public servants.

Mr. DIXON Did the Government of the day take any steps to prepare after this particular information was given by such an important public servant, or did they go on neglecting it?

Mr. SPEAKER The Noble Lord cannot answer for the last Government but one.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1917/mar/22/german-foreign-policy
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 19:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Second battle of the Somme, 21 March-4 April 1918

The first day of the battle had been very costly for the Germans. They suffered almost 40,000 casualties, slightly more than they inflicted on the BEF. More seriously, the crucial attack in the north had failed to isolate the Flesquieres salient. The German attack was already beginning to head in the wrong direction.

That would have been of little comfort to Gough or the Fifth Army. On 22 March they continued to fall back, losing the last foothold in their original frontline during the day. The biggest retreat was made by XVIII corps, in the middle of Fifth Army, whose commander, General Ivor Maxse, seems to have misjudged an order from Gough for a fighting retreat as allowing him to pull back all the way to the Somme. The biggest danger on 22 March was that the two British armies might become separated – Byng was perhaps too keen to hang on to the Flesquieres salient, won at such cost on the previous day, and Haig had to order him to keep in contact with Gough’s army, even if that required a bigger retreat than the fighting would otherwise justify. The day also saw the first French troops enter the battle, on the south of the line.

http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/battles_sommeII.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 20:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Stars and Stripes, France, March 22, 1918
The Official Newspaper By and For the Soldiers of the A.E.F.


48 MEDALS AWARDED IN LUNEVILLE SECTOR
Every Rank from Colonel to Private and Most of United States Represented in New Group of Honor Men

Forty-eight more Americans have been awarded the cherished Croix de Guerre for gallantry in action. All 48 have been engaged in the sector east of Luneville—a new combat area for American troops. They represent all ranks, from colonels down to humble buck privates; and they represent nearly all sections of the United States from way down south in Alabam’ to ‘way up north in Minnesota.

Other American troops have had the Croix de Guerre distributed among their numbers in addition to those already listed in The Stars and Stripes, but those lists are not as yet available. In fact, the habit of annexing the coveted war cross of France has become so general among the Americans at the front that it is hard, at times, to keep up with the awards and citations as they are made. The names of those who won the medal in the operations further to the west than the Luneville and Toul sectors will, however, be speedily forthcoming.

Lees verder op http://iagenweb.org/greatwar/mispub/st&stp/France-22Mar1918.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 20:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

VCs of the First World War - Spring Offensive 1918

Ernest Frederick Beal

Ernest Frederick Beal VC (27 January 1885- 22 March 1918) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

He was 33 years old, and a Temporary Second Lieutenant in The Yorkshire Regiment (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own), British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 21/22 March 1918 at St.-Léger, France, Second Lieutenant Beal was in command of a company detailed to occupy a certain section of trench. When the company was established it was found necessary to clear a gap of about 400 yards held by the enemy between the left flank of the company and the neighbouring unit. Second Lieutenant Beal therefore organised a small party and led them along the trench, capturing four machine-guns and inflicting heavy casualties. Later in the evening he brought in on his back a wounded man who was lying close to an enemy machine-gun.

He was killed in action, St.-Léger, France, on 22 March 1918.

His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Green Howards Museum (Richmond, Yorkshire, England).

http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en/Ernest_Frederick_Beal

Herbert George Columbine

Herbert George Columbine VC (28 November 1893 – 22 March 1918) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

He was 24 years old, and a private in the 9th Squadron, Machine Gun Corps, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 22 March 1918 at Hervilly Wood, France, Private Columbine took over command of a gun and kept firing it from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in an isolated position with no wire in front. During this time wave after wave of the enemy failed to get up to him, but at last with the help of a low-flying aircraft the enemy managed to gain a strong foothold in the trench. As the position was now untenable, Private Columbine told the two remaining men to get away, and although he was being bombed on either side, he kept his gun firing, inflicting losses, until he was killed by a bomb which blew him up along with his gun. Columbine was only 24 years old when he died.

The local leisure centre at Walton-on-the-Naze has now been named after him.

http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en/Herbert_George_Columbine

Reginald Frederick Johnson Hayward

Reginald Frederick Johnson Hayward VC, MC & Bar (17 June 1891- 17 January 1978) was a South African recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

He was 26 years old, and an Acting Captain in the 1st Battalion, The Wiltshire Regiment, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 21/22 March 1918 near Fremicourt, France, while commanding a company, Captain Hayward displayed almost superhuman powers of endurance. In spite of the fact that he was buried, wounded in the head and rendered deaf on the first day of operations and had his arm shattered two days later, he refused to leave his men (even though he received a third serious injury to his head) until he collapsed from sheer exhaustion. Throughout this period the enemy were attacking the company's front without cessation, but Captain Hayward continued to move across the open from one trench to another with absolute disregard for his own safety.

Lees meer op http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en/Reginald_Frederick_Johnson_Hayward
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 20:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Diary of Paul B Hendrickson

Mar 22. Sat at Mersch 230- slept in casual camp & arrived in Ettelbruck at 9 am. Like home again. Rec. letters mother-Feb 17-25, Leah Feb 23, Pearl Feb 19, Bertha Feb 21, Maude Feb 20, Cecil Feb 23, Sid F 28. cousin Irene is 146 Dover St. Dayton Ohio. Sent home box - books on Nice; Vianden, note book; book of pictures; soap box; compas; 2 bags coins; 3 iron crosses; 3 small Croix De Gue.; 1 crox LeGere; 1 Belg. croi deguerre; 4 Verdun medals; wrote to Mother. got buckle fixed. got tripple shot in arm & its sore.

http://www.jimgill.net/wwipages/diary/pd190316.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 20:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

22 March 1920, Written Answers (Commons)

HOUSE OF COMMONS (ATTENDANCE OF MINISTERS).


HC Deb 22 March 1920 vol 127 cc53-4W 53W

Captain TUDOR REES asked the Prime Minister whether certain Ministers have not attended the House on a single occasion during the present Session to answer questions addressed to, or to 54W deal with Votes connected with, their Departments; and whether he would use his influence with them to attend?

The PRIME MINISTER I am not aware of the facts as stated by my hon. and gallant Friend.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written_answers/1920/mar/22/house-of-commons-attendance-of-ministers
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2010 21:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Gezichten van een Grote Oorlog

Op 21 maart 1897 vlak voor middernacht werd Leo Baelden in de ouderlijke hoeve in Wulveringem geboren. Zijn geboorte kon pas de volgende dag aangegeven worden en dus werd zijn officiële verjaardag 22 maart.(...)

De ongehuwde landbouwknecht, die op 1 juni 1916 opgeroepen was, meldde zich op 8 juli 1916 bij het leger aan. Soldaat 2de klasse Leo Baelden behoorde tot het speciaal contingent 1916. Zijn stamnummer was 133/2280. Na zijn gewone opleiding werd hij ondanks zijn verminderd zicht – categorie A8 in die tijd - naar het Centre d'Instruction des Mitrailleurs in Honfleur doorverwezen. Daar kreeg hij een bijkomende opleiding om met een mitrailleur te leren omgaan. Vanaf 1915 reorganiseerde en moderniseerde het Belgisch leger zich. Belgische fabrieken voor artillerie ontstonden in Frankrijk en Engeland. Het artilleriepark breidde uit. Veel meer soldaten waren nodig om de artilleriestukken te bedienen. Later werd er ook naar gestreefd om elk bataljon van de infanterie met een compagnie mitrailleurs uit te rusten. Op 21 oktober 1916 beëindigde Leo zijn opleiding. Daarna zorgde hij een tijd voor de voeding, kleding en bevoorrading van de troepen.

Op 5 juli 1917 voegde Leo zich bij het 3de Karabiniersregiment. Dit regiment behoorde tot de 6de Legerdivisie. Leo Baelden maakte deel uit van de 4de Compagnie. Het 3de Regiment Karabiniers lag in die periode (van 4 tot 15 juli 1917) in reserve in barakken te Leisele. Daarna begaven ze zich weer naar het front in Nieuwkapelle en vervolgens naar de sector Sint-Jacobskapelle. Waarschijnlijk ging Leo die zomer thuis helpen bij de oogst, want op 11 augustus 1917 kreeg hij een maand verlof 'sans solde'.(...)

Op 4 februari 1918 ging het 3de Karabiniers naar Wulveringem en Vinkem. Van daar trokken ze verder richting De Panne om het zeefront te verzekeren. Bataljon I, waartoe Leo Baelden behoorde, bevond zich op 10 maart 1918 in de eerste lijn te Nieuwendamme – Sint-Joris in de sector Nieuwpoort. Een hevig Duits bombardement met obussen en stikgassen deed op 18 maart om 6 uur ’s morgens het Gevecht bij Nieuwendamme uitbreken. De vooruitgeschoven bewakingsposten van het 3de Regiment trokken zich terug. De vijand viel hevig aan en enkele posten van de lijn ‘Fortins’ voor Sint-Joris vielen in hun handen, maar rond 8 uur werden ze heroverd. In de sector van Nieuwendamme gingen de Duitsers vooruit tot de ‘Kruisdijk’ en de ‘Redan du Gaulois’.
Om 9.30u. viel een Duitse granaat in Leo’s buurt. De scherven doorboorden zijn schedel en Leo stierf bijna onmiddellijk. Tijdens het hevige gevecht van 18 en 19 maart 1918 vielen 230 doden en gewonden.(...)

De jonge Baelden werd begraven op 22 maart 1918 (net op zijn 21ste verjaardag!) in De Panne ‘Duinhoek’, graf 3/133. Enkele jaren na de oorlog werden de erfgenamen van Leo Baelden ‘vergoed’. Ze kregen 675 Belgische frank voor de 9 maanden aan het front, en 600 frank voor de 12 maanden die hij ver weg van het front doorbracht, bijvoorbeeld wanneer hij zijn opleiding volgde.

Stijn Louwagie, Jasper Hillewaere, Adriaan Sticker, http://www.collegeveurne.be/archief/projectgesned/baelden.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2010 9:11    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Depth charge

The depth charge is an anti-submarine weapon intended to defeat its target by the shock of exploding near it. Most use explosives and a fuze set to go off at a predetermined depth. Some have been designed to use nuclear warheads. Depth charges can be deployed by both ships and aircraft.

The concept of a "dropping mine" was first discussed in 1910, and the idea was developed into practicality when the British Royal Navy’s Commander-in-Chief of the Home Fleets, Admiral Sir George Callaghan, requested its production in 1914. The design work was carried out by Herbert Taylor at HMS Vernon Torpedo and Mine School in Portsmouth, England. The first effective depth charge, the "Type D", became available in January 1916. These were barrel-like casings containing a high explosive, usually TNT or amatol.

A hydrostatic pistol actuated by water pressure at a pre-selected depth detonated the charge. Initial depth settings were 40 feet and 80 feet (12 and 24 meters.) Anti-submarine vessels initially carried only two depth charges to be released from a chute at the stern of the ship. The first success was the sinking of SM U-68 off Kerry, Ireland, on 22 March 1916 by the Q-ship Farnborough. Germany became aware of the depth charge following unsuccessful attacks on U-67 on 15 April 1916 and U-69 on 20 April 1916. UC-19 and UB-29 were the only other submarines sunk by depth charge during 1916.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_charge

Of lees anders deze buitengewoon boeiende, erg accurate vertaling:

Dieptebom

dieptebom is anti-submarine wapen bedoeld zijn doel door de schok van het exploderen dichtbij het te verslaan. Meeste gebruiksexplosieven en de a zekering reeks om bij een vooraf bepaalde diepte af te gaan. Wat zijn ontworpen aan gebruik kern kernkoppen. De dieptebommen kunnen door zowel schepen als vliegtuigen worden opgesteld.

Het concept een „het dalen mijn werd“ eerst binnen besproken 1910, en het idee werd ontwikkeld tot praktisch aspect toen de Britten Koninklijke Marine' sBevelhebber in Leider, Admiraal van de Vloot de Heer George Callaghan, verzocht binnen om zijn productie 1914. Het ontwerpwerk werd uitgevoerd door Herbert Taylor bij HMS Vernon De School van de torpedo en van de Mijn in Portsmouth, Engeland. De eerste efficiënte dieptebom, het „Type D“, werd beschikbaar in Januari van 1916. Dit waren vat-als omhulsels die een hoogte bevatten explosief, gewoonlijk TNT of amatol. Er was aanvankelijk twee grootte -- een 300 pond (140 kg) last voor snelle schepen en een 120 pond (55 kg) laden voor schepen te langzaam om het gevaarsgebied van de krachtigere last te ontruimen.

Een „pistool“ dat door waterdruk bij een voorgeselecteerde diepte wordt aangedreven doen ontploffen de last. De aanvankelijke dieptemontages waren 40 voet (12 meters) en 80 voet (24 meters.) Anti-submarine schepen droeg aanvankelijk slechts twee dieptebommen die van een helling bij de achtersteven van het schip moeten worden vrijgegeven. Het eerste succes was het dalen weg van u-68 Kerry, Ierland, op 22 Maart 1916 door Q-schip Farnborough. Duitsland werd bewust van de dieptebom na niet succesvolle aanvallen op u-67 op 15 April 1916 en u-69 op 20 April 1916. Uc-19 en ub-29 waren de enige andere onderzeeërs die door dieptebom in 1916 zijn gedaald.[1]

http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/nl/Depth_charge


Aanvulling 2018: First Successful Use of Depth Charges on 22 March 1916

Q-ships, apparently innocuous merchant vessels with heavy but concealed armaments, were used by the British to combat U-boats. Submarines often surfaced to sink small merchant ship with their deck guns in order to conserve their torpedoes for more attractive. One of the Q-ships was HMS Farnborough, captained by Lieutenant-Commander Gordon Campbell, which was armed with five 12 pounders, two 6 pounders, a Maxim machine gun, rifles and depth charges.[1] She had originally been the collier Loderer. Her crew as a Q-ship was 11 officers and 56 men, compared with six officers and 25 men as a collier.[2]

On 22 March Farnborough was off the coast of Kerry when SM U68 (Kapitänleutnant Ludwig Güntzel) fired a torpedo that missed her. The U-boat surfaced and fired a shot across the bows of what appeared to be a collier. The crew apparently abandoned ship, but the gun crews had remained behind.

U68 closed to 800 yards and opened fire. The collier then raised the white ensign and opened fire. U68 was hit but managed to dive. Campbell then took Farnborough over her and dropped a depth charge. The U-boat came out of the water at a perpendicular angle, revealing damage to her bow. Farnborough fired five more shots into her and then dropped two more depth charges as she dived. Oil and wood then came to the surface and U68 was lost was all hands.[3]

The British first ordered depth charges in August 1915 and began to issue them to the fleet in January 1916. This was the first ever sinking of a submarine by depth charges.[4]

Campbell was promoted to Commander and awarded the Distinguished Service Order. Two of the other officers received the Distinguished Service Cross and three men the Distinguished Service Medal.[5]

[1] Naval Staff Monograph (Historical) 1926 vol. xv, Home Waters part vi, October 1915 to May 1916. p. 101.
[2] T. Bridgland, Sea Killers in Disguise: The Story of the Q Ships and Decoy Ships in the First World War (London: Leo Cooper, 1999), p. 14.
[3] Naval Staff vol. Xv. p. 101.
[4] A. J. Marder, From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow; the Royal Navy in the Fisher Era, 1904-1919, 5 vols. (London: Oxford University Press, 1961-70). vol. ii, p. 350.
[5] (Naval Staff vol. Xv. p. 101.


https://warandsecurity.com/2016/03/22/first-successful-use-of-depth-charges-on-22-march-1916/
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Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 22 Mrt 2018 9:03, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2010 9:17    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

J.R.R. Tolkien

Verloving en Huwelijk: Op zestienjarige leeftijd leerde Tolkien de vrouw Edith Mary Bratt kennen, die drie jaar ouder was. J.R.R. en Hilary Tolkien woonden toen in hetzelfde kosthuis. Humphrey Carpenter schrijft hierover, dat Edith en Ronald geregeld naar tearooms in Birmingham gingen, met name naar een tearoom die een balkon had met uitzicht op straat. Ze zaten daar suikerklontjes in de hoeden van voorbijgangers te gooien en als het suikerpotje leeg was gingen ze naar het volgende tafeltje. Er moest wel iets moois opbloeien tussen twee zo gelijkgestemde mensen. Ze waren allebei wees en hadden beide behoefte aan genegenheid, en die konden ze elkaar ook schenken. In de zomer van 1909 wisten ze dat ze verliefd op elkaar waren.

Frater Francis Morgan, zijn voogd, vond dat Edith Tolkien teveel afleiddde van zijn studie, en het vervulde hem met afschuw dat zijn jonge pupil een serieuze relatie had met een Protestants meisje. Hij verbood hem haar te zien, te spreken of zelfs maar te schrijven, totdat hij 21 was. Hij hield zich strikt aan dit verbod, op een enkele uitzondering na, waardoor frater Morgan dreigde een einde te maken aan zijn universitaire carrière als hij er niet mee ophield.

Vlak voor zijn 21ste verjaardag schreef Tolkien zijn vriendin Edith een brief en verklaarde hij haar zijn liefde voor haar en vroeg hij haar ten huwelijk. Edith antwoordde hierop dat ze al verloofd was met een andere man, maar dat had ze gedaan omdat ze dacht dat Tolkien niet langer om haar gaf. Ze liepen elkaar weer tegen het lijf en bij een spoorwegviaduct bloeide hun liefde weer op. Edith gaf haar verlovingsring terug en vertelde dat ze met Tolkien ging trouwen. Nadat ze verloofd waren bekeerde Edith zich op aandringen van Tolkien tot het Katholieke geloof.

In januari 1913 verloofden ze zich in Birmingham, en op 22 maart 1916 trouwden ze in Warwick in de Saint Mary Immaculate Catholic Church.

Eerste Wereldoorlog: Het Verenigd Koninkrijk was toen betrokken bij de Eerste Wereldoorlog.

Tolkien nam vrijwillig dienst in het Britse Leger en werd tweede luitenant bij de Lancashire Fusiliers.

Zijn opleiding bij het 13de (reserve) bataljon in Cannock Chase, Staffordshire duurde elf maanden. Hij werd vervolgens overgeplaatst naar het 11de bataljon van de British Expeditionary Force, en hij kwam op 4 juni 1916 in Frankrijk aan. Hierover schreef hij later: "Jonge officieren sneuvelden er bij bosjes. Gescheiden te moeten zijn van mijn vrouw ... ik ging eraan onderdoor."

Tijdens de Slag aan de Somme was Tolkien verbindingsofficier. Hij nam ook deel aan de Slag bij Thiepval.

Later kreeg hij op 27 oktober 1916 last van loopgravenkoorts, een ziekte die werd overgedragen door luizen, waarvan het wemelde in de loopgraven. Tolkien ging op 8 november 1916 als oorlogsinvalide terug naar Engeland. Vele van zijn naaste vrienden waren gesneuveld. Jaren later zei Tolkien hierover verontwaardigd, dat degenen die zochten naar overeenkomsten tussen zijn boeken en de Tweede Wereldoorlog er volledig naast zaten:

"Je moet zelf de oorlog hebben meegemaakt om te weten wat dat is. Met het verstrijken van de tijd lijkt men nu vaak te vergeten dat het niet minder erg was om in 1914 als jongeman verwikkeld te raken in de Eerste Wereldoorlog dan het nu is betrokken te zijn bij de Tweede Wereloorlog. In 1918 waren op een na al mijn vrienden gesneuveld."

Een verzwakte en uitgemergelde Tolkien - hij werd afgekeurd voor het front - bracht de rest van de oorlog door in militaire hospitalen of in garnizoensdienst. Toen werd ook de eerste zoon van Edith en J.R.R. geboren, John Francis Reuel Tolkien. Hij was erg trots op zijn zoon (begrijpelijk) en super blij!

"Super blij"... Joepie... http://smeagel.webs.com/jrrtolkien.htm

The Great War Blog: 22 March 1916 – The Power Of Myth

After a three-year engagement, today John Ronald Reuel Tolkien finally marries Edith Bratt, the love of his life, at St. Mary Immaculate Roman Catholic Church in Warwick. Having delayed enlistment until he finished his degree at Exeter College, Oxford, Tolkien is now a lieutenant... (..)

Lees verder op http://ww1blog.osborneink.com/?p=12139
(Aanvulling 20180322)
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Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 22 Mrt 2018 8:46, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2011 23:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Königliche Bibiliothek 22 März 1914

Gezicht in de grote koepelzaal van het nieuwe gebouw van de Königliche Bibliothek zu Berlin aan Unter den Linden, op 22 maart 1914. In de zaal zitten mannen en een enkele vrouw tegenover keizer Wilhelm II en de hoogwaardigheidsbekleders op een podium. De plechtigheid vindt plaats ter gelegenheid van de inwijding van het gebouw na de verhuizing van de bibliotheek uit de "Kommode" aan de voormalige Opernplatz (huidige Bebelplatz) in 1913-1914.

Fotootjes...
http://fotocollectie.huisdoorn.nl/HuDF-A110-13
http://fotocollectie.huisdoorn.nl/HuDF-A110-08
http://fotocollectie.huisdoorn.nl/HuDF-A110-04
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2011 11:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Pour le Mérite

De onderscheiding Pour le Mérite werd in 1740 gecreëerd door Frederik de Grote (1712-1786). De militaire versie bestond tot 1918, de burgerlijke bestaat nog steeds. In het Engels wordt ze The Blue Max genoemd. Ook in Duitsland heeft de bijnaam "Der Blaue Max" ingang gevonden.

Veldmaarschalk Gottlieb Graf von Haeseler
- verleend op 22 maart 1915
- Eikenbladeren op 22 maart 1915

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pour_le_M%C3%A9rite &
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gottlieb_Graf_von_Haeseler.jpg
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2011 11:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

March 22, 1919

Really unusual one here - this copy of a photo was made on this date for a Mr Power of Carriganura, Kilkenny, or maybe Carriganore, Waterford. Looks like somewhere hot, and most people who commented below are suggesting that this photo may have been taken during the Boer War... Date (copy made): Saturday, 22 March 1919.

Uw hulp wordt gevraagd... https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/6892874434
(Vervanging van een oude post met dode link, 20180321)
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2011 11:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Slag om Gallipoli - De landing

Op de krijgsraad van 22 maart 1915, aan boord van de HMS Elisabeth, spreken viceadmiraal Boue de Lapeyrère, commandant van de Franse Middellandse Zeevloot, generaal Hamilton, viceadmiraal De Robeck en de Franse generaal Baillard, af om op 14 april 1915 op Gallipoli te landen. De 29° divisie zal op Helles landen, de Anzacs bij Caba Tebe, de Royal Naval Division bij Bulais, een Franse eenheid bij Kum Kale en de Basika Baai en een Brits bataljon bij Morto Baai. Bij Krithia zou 2000 man worden afgezet. Men verwachtte weinig of geen tegenstand.

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slag_om_Gallipoli
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2011 11:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Groesbeek het dorp der verrassingen - Verzending van bosbessen, 1920

'Zij vonden een armelijk bestaan door het plukken van boschbessen, die thans nog een zeer belangrijk uitvoerartikel vormen, vooral naar Engeland', schrijft Wikman in 1929. De foto is omstreeks 1920 gemaakt op de laad en losplaats van station Groesbeek. Hier brachten de opkopers, per paard en kar, hun bosbessenmandjes, die verder per trein naar Rotterdam en per boot naar Hull in Engeland werden vervoerd. Daar werden de bosbessen opgekocht door kolenmijneigenaars, die ze als geneesmiddel verstrekten aan mijnwerkers. Deze hadden vaak last van wormen en de bosbessen stonden bekend als een uitstekend geneesmiddel tegen deze kwaal. De spoorman links is Arnold Hagemans, die als ladingmeester verantwoordelijk was voor het stuwen van de kwetsbare lading. Rechts van hem staat J.A. Dekker, een handelaar die hier aan de Kerkstraat woonde van 1909 tot 1921. In de zomer was hij één van de plaatselijke bosbessenopkopers; daarnaast stond hij bekend als hout en bezemhandelaar. Zo kocht hij percelen bomen en liet deze kappen door Groesbeekse houthakkers. Als deze in de zomer werkeloos waren liet hij ze bezembinden in de oude school aan de Kerkstraat. Volgens overlevering waren er jaren dat er wel meer dan 70 mannen aan het bezembinden waren in de voormalige school. Deze werd op 22 maart 1915 door Dekker gehuurd, die de gemeente Groesbeek hiervoor f 150,-- per jaar betaalde.

http://www.geschiedenisgroesbeek.nl/prent108.htm
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2011 11:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Fragmenten uit de eerste wereldoorlog (1914-1918)

Uitgaande correspodentie van den Burgemeester

22 september 1914

Gedeelte brief gericht aan Kantonement Commandant.

“Ernstig vermoeden omtrent het opdrijven van koolprijzen voor de werken der militairen in Sprundel. Een verloopig onderzoek heeft ons er toe gebracht althans voorlopig niets te betalen”

6 februari 1915

Gedeelte uit brief gericht aan Kolonel Com. de 11 infanterie Brigade te Leur.

“ Mijn vaste overtuiging is, dat de kwartiergevers toch nog veel meer hebben ontvangen, dan hun wettig toekwam. In boerenschuren lagen toen 40, 50 tot 60 mensen op den vloer met een bos stro zonder lakens, dekens of wat ook en daarvoor werd 8-10 tot 12 gulden per dag uitbetaald.

22 maart 1915

Een requistrant (kwartiergever) tekende bezwaar aan bij het ministerie van oorlog tegen een te kleine vergoeding die hij ontvangen zou hebben voor het verlenen van onderdak aan een officier. In een daaropvolgende brief werd de burgemeester van Rucphen door de Brigade Commissaris van Bergen op Zoom verantwoording gevraagd over de klacht van de requistrant.

Gedeelte uit brief van de Burgemeester gericht aan de Heer Kolonel Brigade Commssaris te Bergen op Zoom

“ Requistrant ontving voor huisvesting van officier van 12 augustus af laat ik zeggen ¦ 230. Ik heb te Sprundel één jaar gewoond en betaalde voor een heel huis met tuin per jaar ¦ 100. Die vergelijking is wel niet zuiver maar zegt toch wel iets…”

In de loop van 1915 verlieten de meeste militairen Sprundel en werden de scholen weer volledig in gebruik genomen voor het reguliere onderwijs van de Sprundelse kinderen.

Een ingezonden krantenbericht uit de Grondwet (24 september 1915) onder het pseudoniem v.R. namens het bevoegd gezag in Sprundel, stelt het gebruik en/of misbruik van vergoedingen ter discussie. De onderstaande tekst is letterlijk uit het krantenbericht overgenomen.

Zoo vergaat de heerlijkheid der wereld.

Sprundel 24 Sept. Men schrijft ons van bevoegde zijde uit Sprundel:

Stil is het in onze Dorpstraat, doodstil. Meer dan een jaar lang waren we een garnizoensplaats. Het dreunend gerammel van de kannonen, het helder getiktak van hoefijzers op de dorpsklinkers het van alles te onderscheiden kort afgebroken schuifelend gedons van een voorbij marcheerende troep, het opstaan en slapen gaan op het geschetter van den trompet; ’t is alles voorbij. ’t Is zo stil in ons dorpken. Een telefoonpaal zonder draad, een half zwart berookte keuken, een kaal gelopen terrein, hier en daar, een kookketel met drie poten, een of geen oor en gesprongen deksel, dat wekt nog zoo nu en dan de herinnering aan die drukke tijden. Ten minste van buiten, maar binnen in de woningen is men aan ’t centen tellen. Een boel centen zijn met die soldaten binnen komen rollen en ieder ving er zoo wat van op en nu is men zoo stilletjes bij de petroleumlamp aan ‘t stapelen. Er zijn menschen die altijd wat te reclameren hebben, die ook midden in ’t veen op een turfje zien, die een gegeven paard met een vergrootglas in de bek kijken, die wijzen op een wormstekige, als men hun een mand appels cadeau geeft; maar de groote hoop is tevreden met den oogst. Een fout is ‘t dat onze burgerij dien militairen nooit iets aangeboden heeft. Een prijs bij een militair spel of wedstrijd, een traktaatje in de cantine waren wel aardig geweest als bewijs van erkentelijkheid van waardering. Dat zou er beter ingegaan zijn dan sommige krenterige reclames over een ding van geen betekenis.’t Kan toch niet ons eigen schuld zijn, dat we zoo in eens verlaten blijven zitten. En nu alles stil is, nu de herbergen weer leeg zijn, komt er plaats voor de tafelrondte om de gewenste dorpszaken te bespreken. Vanzelf komt dan de dure tijd en daarmee het dreigend te kort op de tafel en op het bed en in de kleerkast van de arme. En dan, het steuncomité, dat weer helpen zal, geleerd door ondervinding, zelfs beter dan verleden jaar. Het Kon. Nat. Steuncomité te Amsterdam, vraagt een gulle bijdrage van hen die door den toestand een extraat verdienden. Sprundel, houd u nu goed, toon, dat ge het genoten voorrecht waard zijt nu niet om dat laatste kwartje, dat ge misschien nog te vorderen hebt. Sputter nu niet tegen alles en nog wat, maar maak een nuttig gebruik van uw mobilisatie-buitenkansje, een nuttig gebruik ja, maar niet enkel en alleen voor u zelf.


Artikel uit het jaarboek 2003 heemkundekring “Baronie en Markiezaat”, http://www.heemkundekringsprundel.nl/w.o.1.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2018 21:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

OLIVE EDIS - Through the Lens of Britain's First Female War Photographer

22nd March 1919 - On Saturday 22nd we made for Chalons, where a Maternité run by Les Amis had done excellent work… Miss Pye had started this and devoted herself heart and soul to the work, and it was shortly to be turned over to the French to run, with a staff of nurses trained by herself.

Nearly 1000 babies had been born there, a recent pair of twins doing their best to mount up the figures. I photographed the original first ward, the twins sleeping blissfully throughout the exposure, whilst other infants howled and waved their little fists.

Miss Pye came in later, a most sweet and striking personality, with dark eyes and hair and a very worn face. She was really ill, and had carried through this fine piece of work under the most uncomfortable and difficult conditions.

Our next town was Rheims, to which I looked forward with peculiar interest. Nothing that we had previously seen could touch the scene of destruction it presented… In the whole of that great city on five houses remained intact.

I firmly refused tea, and Mr. Blow whirled me off in the car to the opposite end of the town, nominally to get letters at the Poste Restante and to find the lost Miss Conway, really because he was determined that I should get a plate of St. Rémy… I got an extremely expeditious plate of the beautiful side door…and had a look at the ruins; and we then once more risked other people’s lives and limbs in a dash back at top speed, picking up Miss Conway and the letters… We had a long jouney before us; but to be in Rheims and get no plates was more than could be expected of any human photographer.

Klik voor de foto's door naar https://oliveedisproject.wordpress.com/2016/03/22/22nd-march-1919/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Mrt 2018 22:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Mooi bezig, Percy! thumbs up

Gr P
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 8:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Pegoud @ 21 Mrt 2018 22:20 schreef:
Mooi bezig, Percy! thumbs up
Gr P

Bedankt, Pegoud!
Ik ben erachter dat ik iets therapeutisch haal uit het verzamelen van dingen... Rolling Eyes ... ook al is het virtueel...
Bovendien ben ik er (heel onlangs) achter gekomen dat ik berichten van lang geleden nú nog kan bewerken. Op die manier kan ik 'dode' afbeeldingen en links verwijderen en bij voorkeur zelfs vervangen door nieuwe.
Groet,
PT
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 8:26    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Gertrude Bell to her stepmother, Dame Florence Bell

Sunday March 22. [22 March 1914] We are within sight of Nejef [Najaf, An]. I have camped an hour from the town because I knew there is no camping ground near it and I should probably have to put up in the government serai, which is tiresome. Also I very much want to get through to Baghdad without questions and telegrams. - Oh but it is a long dull way from Nejd [Najd]! I wanted to come up by the old pilgrim road which has a certain historic interest and is also the shortest, but the morning I left Hayyil [Hail] came a slave with a message to say I was to travel by the western road as the eastern was not safe. I Bellieve this tale to have been entirely untrue and I fancy their object was to ensure my meeting the Amir, but as I did not much mind one way or the other I acquiesced. Two days out we met the Amir's messengers bringing in a tale (which they served up to us) of a highly successful raid, the flight of all the 'Anazeh before the Amir and the capture of Jof [Jawf, Al (Al Jauf)]. They said the Amir was a few days further on. But when we had crossed the Nefud [Nafud, An], for 4 days and came near the place where he was reported to have been, he had left and crossed over to the eastern road and was said to be off raiding some tribes further east. (...)

Wie wil weten welke substantie Gertrude gerookt/gesnoven/gedronken heeft, kan verder lezen op http://gertrudebell.ncl.ac.uk/letter_details.php?letter_id=61

Exact een jaar later: Gertrude Bell to her stepmother, Dame Florence Bell, [22 March 1915] Boulogne March 22 1915 : http://gertrudebell.ncl.ac.uk/letter_details.php?letter_id=111
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 8:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Northern Epirus Flag raised in Korytsa March 1914

Northern Epirus Flag raised in Korytsa/Korca, Northern Epirus (modern southeast Albania), during the revolt of Korytsa (March 22, 1914 [O.S.]

Foto... https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Northern_Epirus_Flag_raised_in_Korytsa_March_1914.jpg
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 8:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

22 March 1915; Monday | The Diary of Arthur L. Linfoot

22 March 1915; Monday - At work as usual. Typed summary. Got work well up to date. Some wounded in at night and Joe and I went down to see them. Alan Carr in at night. Did pretty well in the shop. A good deal better.

https://www.arthurlinfoot.org.uk/2015/03/22/22-march-1915-monday/

22 March 1916; Wednesday | The Diary of Arthur L. Linfoot

22 March 1916; Wednesday - On parade as usual in the morning. Half day and off in the afternoon. Wrote long letter to Betty. [4-­5 words deleted by ALL, illegible.] On stable picket at night and slept in the guard room. Spent a pretty restless night.

https://www.arthurlinfoot.org.uk/2016/03/22/22-march-1916-wednesday/
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 8:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

MARCH SNIPPETS FROM THE ROYAL LEAMINGTON SPA COURIER AND WARWICKSHIRE STANDARD – 1915

Warwick and Country Edition, Page 4, Column 4, 26th March 1915
Police Courts. Leamington Borough. 22nd March 1915.

“Absurd Way of Expressing Sorrow”. John Henry Dovey had been accused of fighting on 13th March 1915 and of being drunk on 19th March 1915. The defendant said he “had a lot of beer, being upset about his 3 brothers who had come home wounded from the Front. One brother had lost a thumb and another had a bullet through his chest. He regretted what he had done and would promise to sign the pledge if given another chance. Fined 10 shillings and 6 pence. The Mayor told him that the excuse about his brothers coming home wounded was a very sad way of showing his sorrow. It was most absurd for a man to pretend that his sorrow was to be expressed in drink.

https://www.ourwarwickshire.org.uk/content/article/march-snippets-royal-leamington-spa-courier-warwickshire-standard-1915
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 8:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

HMAS Pioneer

On this day, 22 March 1916, HMAS Pioneer, in company with HM Ships Vengance and Hyacinth destroyed the German ship Tabora in Dar-es-Salaam Harbour, the capital of German East Africa.

http://www.navy.gov.au/hmas-pioneer via https://www.facebook.com/RoyalAustralianNavy/photos/p.1870946692920022/1870946692920022/?type=3
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 8:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

HANSARD → 22 March 1916 → Lords Sitting

PRISONERS OF WAR.

LORD LAMINGTON My Lords, I rise to ask His Majesty's Government what are the regulations with regard to the employment of prisoners of war and of interned civilians. It has not been easy to get any precise information on this subject, but I understand that there are certain facts in connection with it. One is that, although we have been at war for more than eighteen months, there have been no regulations issued respecting the employment of prisoners, or, if any have been issued, it is only at quite a recent date. I know that there has been a certain amount of employment conducted by the prisoners in making roads about the camps, putting up barbed wire fences, and in other minor matters of that kind, but I do not think very much employment has been allowed to prisoners outside their camps. I am even told that in one camp, where numerous huts are being built for the reception of prisoners, the work is being carried out under the supervision of the Royal Engineers but is put out to contract. The prisoners were not allowed to help in the building of the huts because it would have been against some trade union rule. I was told of another case where an offer was made by the commandant of a prisoners' camp to allow the prisoners to work on the public roads, but the local authority or some other body intervened and said it would not be permissible because it would be offending some labour organisation.

It seems incredible in these days, when there is such a scarcity of labour and when attempts are made on every side to get people to undertake the multifarious forms of employment to be carried out, that there should be any opposition to the utilisation of the labour of these prisoners. Considerable limitation is necessarily imposed by the difficulty of obtaining sufficient escorts to guard the prisoners outside the camps, but it should be easy to bring various forms of employment to the camps where the prisoners might give useful service. I believe it is done in France 443 to a large extent. There a great number of prisoners are usefully employed. The prisoners in this country are well looked after, well fed, and well housed, but they suffer from lack of something to do; and it would not be contrary to the wish of the prisoners if they were allowed facilities to work outside their camps. And as they would be remunerated they might thus put by some small sum of money. This, moreover, would not be in conflict with The Hague Convention, because in Article 6 it is laid clown that— Prisoners may be authorised to work for the public service, for private service, or on their own account. They may not, of course, do any work in connection with operations of war. But I read in the Press that this is what Germany is doing. She is employing her prisoners in connection with war work, but we do not wish to emulate Germany in that respect. Yet facilities ought to be given to prisoners to do useful service.

Before I sit down I should like to ask a Question of which I have given private notice—namely, what is being done in the case of prisoners in Turkey? All through this war, whether in Gallipoli or Mesopotamia, the Turks have, by every account, been most fair and honourable and chivalrous in their methods of conducting the war; and in yesterday's newspapers there was an account of how well the prisoners were treated who were taken off the "Tara." I hope the noble Lord who will answer this Question will be able to give some assurance that our prisoners who are in the hands of the Turks are equally well considered and looked after, and treated in a way something resembling the Turk's honourable methods of conducting war.

Lees vooral verder op http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/lords/1916/mar/22/prisoners-of-war
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 8:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The First World War Letters of Jack Peirs

8th Queens
B. E. F.
22. 3. 1916.

My dear Mother,

Very many thanks for your last letter. I hope your foot is all right now, & if not that the pram is still useful as a conveyance. We are now in France, which sounds as though we have gone a long way but really it is not much more than 4 miles from where we were before. Still we are in hilly country which I thought v. pleasant when I first saw it, but am beginning to change my mind as I plough my way round to the billets & have to climb to them by the muddiest lanes imaginable. It is also beginning to snow again, which is not a pleasant change after last weeks warmth & sunshine. We should be here for a few days before moving up & I do not expect we shall be in the trenches for 10 days at least. I had an uneventful journey with the transport yesterday except that the Brigade Machine Gun Company did all it knew to lose its way. I found it originally with its nose pointing up the wrong road & facing the wrong way. they are new to the country & don’t appear to be very intelligent. They also managed to kick & lay out a padre who was with the column, why I don’t know, but I don’t mind much as I know him & he won’t be a great loss.

I have got a v. good feather bed & spring mattress in my billet, so I am quite all right & we have come into a country that was previously inhabited by Canadians who seem to have made themselves v. agreeable. Unfortunately they don’t sell whiskey here, as they never do in the area where the Canadians are so I had to send to Poperinghe for ours to-day.

Love to all

Jack.

http://jackpeirs.org/letters/22-march-1916/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 8:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

On This Day, 22 March 1916 - Birmingham Mail

BIRMINGHAM EAR AND THROAT HOSPITAL - MANY SOLDIERS SUCCESSFULLY TREATED.

Mr. J. Milliken Smith, presiding to-day at the annual meeting of the subscribers of the Birmingham and Midland Ear and Throat Hospital, stated that valuable assistance had been given to the military authorities. One ward was placed at their disposal for the treatment of special ear and throat cases occurring among soldiers until a ward could be opened at one of the military hospitals. Seventy-seven soldiers were treated as in-patients at the institution, and 372 were out-patients. In many cases the soldiers were rendered fit for service again. A large number of cases sent to the hospital from the various recruiting offices were also give gratuitous treatment. The total number of visits by out-patients at the institution was 22,433, and the in-patients numbered 1,110. As many patients came from districts outside Birmingham, Mr. Smith expressed the hope that the outside areas would more liberally recognise the claims of the institution, especially as the subscriptions had fallen off by £42.

http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/2016/03/22/on-this-day-22-march-1916/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 9:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Polykarpos of Moglena Letter to Ion Dragoumis, 22 March 1916

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Polykarpos_of_Moglena_Letter_to_Ion_Dragoumis_22_March_1916.jpg
Geen idee waar het over gaat, maar Wikipedia gebruikt 'm. Doe er uw voordeel mee!
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 9:06    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Worcestershire & World War One - 22nd March 1916

News of 8th Battalion Prisoners: Pte. L.R. Green, writing from Munster says: “ I am in hospital stil, but my wounds are healing quite satisfactorily. We are getting good treatment and being well looked after so that is everything isn’t it? There are plenty of chums here for us and we get on very well on the whole;” Pte. G. Bates writing from Giessen to his wife, says: “I am in the best of health and spirits, and am being treated fairly well. I am in a good camp and with lots of other British prisoners.”

Pershore Man Killed: Pte. Robert Knott has been killed in action. He is well-known in Wick and Pershore, being a grandson of the late Mr. Charles Royston, and a nephew of Mrs. Baylis of the Telephone Exchange, Pershore…He went out to France in July last and was only 20 years of age. A chum, writing to the family, says: “ At about 4am Bob got up on the fire step to execute his duty, but, unfortunately, a German sniper shot him through the head, and death was instantaneous. He suffered no pain. He was the most generous and willing lad in the platoon. Never did he complain of circumstances, and I am heart-broken in consequence, as we two mated together since leaving Weston-Super-Mare.”

William Bishop, of 2, Landsdowne Road, was charged with stealing a half-pint bottle of stout, belonging to Messrs. Lewis, Clarke and Co. The firm had suffered many of these petty thefts and not only in their own interests, but in the interests of public morality, they had decided to bring all these cases to the Court. In this particular case the stout was not taken off the premises, but, all that was necessary was to prove that the bottle had been moved from one position to another with felonious intent…After hearing the evidence, the Bench dismissed the case.

http://www.ww1worcestershire.co.uk/key-dates/1916/03/heenans-man-promoted-to-captain/
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 11:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

22 March 1917

Great Britain, France, Italy, the United States of America, Romania, and Switzerland formerly recognise the new Provisional Government in Russia. British Prime Minister, David Lloyd George, sends a telegram to Russian Prime Minister Lvov, declaring:

There is most profound satisfaction in Great Britain and the overseas Dominions that Russia stands with the nations which base their institutions on responsible government…We believe that the revolution…will be the greatest service yet performed for the Allied cause. There is [no] doubt that the revolution will result in the establishment of a stable constitutional Government, which will strengthen Russia in the resolve to prosecute the war until the last stronghold of tyranny has been destroyed and all free people will unite to attain in the future fraternity and peace.

http://www.centenaryww1orange.com.au/events/22-march-1917/
"READ ALL ABOUT IT!"... hier... https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/209754834/23035377

Ook hier: CONGRATULATIONS TO DUMA.

The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER (Mr. Bonar Law) I beg to move the Resolution which stands in the name of the Prime Minister:
"That this House sends to the Duma its fraternal greetings and tenders to the Russian people its heartiest congratulations upon the establishment among them of free institutions in full confidence that they will lead not only to the rapid and happy progress of the Russian nation but to the prosecution with renewed steadfastness and vigour of the wax against the stronghold of an autocratic militarism which threatens the liberty of Europe."

Lees verder op http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1917/mar/22/congratulations-to-duma
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 11:59    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

New Zealand seamen welcomed home in 1917
CREDIT: Auckland Weekly News (Supplement), 22 March 1917, p. 39

New Zealand ‘Jack tars’ – seamen who had served on the cruiser HMS Philomel – attend a civic luncheon in their honour in Wellington in March 1917.

The return of the vessel, on which many New Zealand crewmen had served in the Pacific, Mediterranean and Middle East, aroused great public interest. Crowds gathered along the men’s route to the reception at the Town Hall. Politicians, including Defence Minister Allen, sang the praises of the British navy and its sailors.

This special welcome was possible only because when Philomel docked for maintenance in Bombay (Mumbai) in January 1917, major repairs to its deck and hull were found to be needed. Rather than undertake this expensive work, the Royal Navy sent the ship back to New Zealand. For the remainder of the war it sat off the Wellington suburb of Thorndon as a stationary base or depot ship.

Foto op https://nzhistory.govt.nz/media/photo/new-zealand-seamen-welcomed-home-1917
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 12:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

13th Middlesex Regt. – WW1 – War Diary - Transcription of the battalion war diary - March 1917

16 – 22 Mar 1917 - In the line. Casualties 7.Capt. A.N. HINGLEY assumed command of the Battalion vice Major C.H. VICKERS JONES admitted hospital 16.3.17. Capt. N.R. MATTHEWS A.A.M.C. performed the duties of M.O. to the Battalion vice Capt. R.A.H. FULTON R.A.M.C. admitted hospital 18.3.17 to 30.3.17. 2/Lt. H.P. LUSCOMBE transferred to England sick 6.3.17.

22 Mar 1917 - Battalion relieved by the 9th Royal Sussex Regt. and became the Battalion in Reserve with H.Q. and 2 Coys in billets in SAINS EN GOHELLE and 2 Coys in BOUVIGNY HUTS. Batt HQ at the Chateau R.1.d.9.2 1/2.

https://13thmiddlesexww1.wordpress.com/home/march-1917/
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 12:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

British soldiers and French refugee children by a field kitchen on a street in Nesle, 22 March 1917.

Foto... https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205237889
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 12:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Cornell Daily Sun, Volume XXXVII, Number 119, 22 March 1917

AMERICANS REBUILD RUINED FRENCH TOWN
California Women Benefactors of Villagers Who Had Lost All.
PEASANTS MUCH IN DOUBT
Printed Plans Made to Prove Sincerity of Project to Inhabitants.
By The Associated Press.

Vitrimont, near Luneville, France, March 21. — American sympathy with the civilian sufferers from the war has been given more concrete expression in this village than in any other part of the devastated country immediately behind the French fighting lines. When Mrs. William Crocker, of San Francisco, chose Vitrimont in which to carry out her idea of reconstructing with her own means one of the villages destroyed by the German troops in their first rush into France she met with much doubt and suspicion. The people of Lorraine are practical and hard-headed and also object to partake of anything given in the form of charity. It was therefore necessary to make the proposition a purely business-like one before laying it before the villagers.

Lees verder op http://cdsun.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/cornell?a=d&d=CDS19170322.2.46
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 12:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

FRIENDS OF ISLINGTON MUSEUM - Home of Islington's Heritage - Away from the Western Front : 22nd March to 16th April 1917

Date: 22 to 23/3/17 - Training + Backing Parades – Usual Routine

Men is bezig met de voorbereidingen voor de First Battle of Gaza – 26/27 March 1917.
Kijk op https://friendsofim.com/2018/02/10/away-from-the-western-front-22nd-march-to-16th-april-1917/
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 12:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Airminded - Airpower and British Society (1908-1941) (Mostly)
Airminded is the research blog of Dr Brett Holman, historian at the University of New England, Armidale, Australia.

Friday, 22 March 1918 - a report submitted by Constable J. Wright of Ouyen police station, in the Mallee region of northwestern Victoria:

I have to report that whilst I was in the vicinity of Nyang about thirty miles from Ouyen at 4 30 pm on 21.3.18 I saw two flying machines pass overhead. They were up an [sic] great height & appeared to be about twenty yards apart. I did not hear the noise of the machines. They proceeded in a Westerly direction & as the sky was particularly clear, the machines were easily discernible.

And that's all Wright wrote. His superiors forwarded his report down to Melbourne, where, three days later, it was received at the Navy Office. There, Lieutenant-Commander J. G. Latham, a former lawyer (and future chief justice) who was head of naval intelligence, read it and commented: 'Reads true'.

Lees verder! https://airminded.org/
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 12:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

22 March 1918 | Centenary of WW1 in Orange

The Leader reports: “What tobacco really means to a soldier has been voiced in more poetry good, bad or indifferent, but always heart-felt—than almost any other subject of the war” and publishes the poem Fags by Corporal Jack Turner:

When the cold is making ice cream of the marrow of your bones.
When you’re shaking like a jelly and your feet are dead as stones,
When your clothes and boots and blankets and your rifle and your kit,
Are soaked from Hell to Breakfast, and the dugout where you sit
Is leaking like a bucket, and upon the muddy floor
The water lies in filthy pools, six inches deep or more;
Tho’ life seems cold and mis’rable and all the world is wet,
You’ll always get through somehow if you’ve got a cigarette.

When Fritz is starting something and his guns are on the bust
When the parapet goes up in chunks, and settles down in dust,
When the roly-poly “rum-jar” comes a-wobling thro’ the air,
‘Til it lands upon a dugout—and the dugout isn’t there;
When the air is full of dust, and smoke, and, scraps of steel, and noise
And you think you’re booked for golden crowns and other Heavenly joys,
When your nerves are all a-tremble and your brain is all a-fret—
It isn’t half so hopeless if you’ve got a cigarette.

Then, when you stop a good one, and the stretcher bearers come
And patch you up with strings, and splints, and bandages and gum;
When you think you’ve got a million wounds and fifty thousand breaks,
And your body’s just a blasted sack packed full of pains and aches;
Then you feel you’re reached the finish, and you’re sure your number’s up,
And you feel as weak as Belgian beer, and helpless as a pup
But you know that you’re not down and out, that life’s worth living yet.
When some old war-wise Red Cross guy slips you a cigarette.

We can do without MacConachies, and Bully, and hard tack,
When Fritz’s curtain fire keeps the ration parties back;
We can do without our greatcoats, and our socks, and shirts, and shoes,
We might almost—tho’ I doubt it get along without our booze;
We can do without ”K.R. and O.,” and “Military Law,”
We can beat the ancient Israelities at making bricks, sans straw;
We can do without a lot of things and still win out, you bet,
But I’d hate to think of soldiering without a cigarette.

http://www.centenaryww1orange.com.au/events/22-march-1918/
Hier in de krant: https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/100960688/10546612
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 12:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Walk March - Diary of a New Zealand Artilleryman, 1917-1919

22nd March (1918) - Back to camp about 9 p.m. was mightily surprised to find the whole place in a ferment – gun-park full of men, lanterns, gear, fodder, ammunition and all the rest of it. We had been warned to be ready to move out and there are wild rumours that the Hun has made a big attack further along the line, inflicting severe losses.
Fritz went on steadily shelling back areas throughout Wednesday night and yesterday, varying his attentions with an occasional bomb.


[Note – the German Spring Offensive started on 21 March 1918. On 22 March the NZ Division was ordered south to the Somme region to help.]

https://walkmarch.blog/2018/03/22/22nd-march-1918/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Mrt 2018 12:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Private Cyril Hurst Crabtree

Cyril was born in Littleborough in 1897 and having lived at 8 Spencer Street with his parents Edwin and Fanny Crabtree, by 1911 they had moved into 160 Whitelees Road, Littleborough and Cyril was employed as a Ring Frame Doffer. Prior to enlisting he worked for Messrs Foxcroft, Featherstall. The Rochdale Observer for 11th May 1918 advised that he had been reported missing from March 22nd 1918. The Rochdale Observer of the 1st June confirmed him missing. At that time, his parents lived at 9 Warley Street. 24 year old Private 34011 Cyril Hurst Crabtree, 8th Bn Leicestershire Regiment, was KILLED IN ACTION in France on Friday the 22nd March 1918. Cyril is remembered on the Pozieres Memorial, the Holy Trinity and Conservative Club War Memorials and Littleborough Cenotaph as well as on a headstone in St James’s Churchyard.

Private Tom Jackson

Tom was born in Littleborough in 1880, the son of Mr William and Mrs Alice Jackson. At the time of the 1881 Census he is recorded as living at Lane Side with his grandparents John (a Warp Sizer Woollen) and Sarah Jackson and their son William (a spinner Woollen) and Grand Daughter Lucy. His father William was a widower. In 1911 Tom and his wife Betty were living at 4 Birch Road, Wardle together with their 7 year old daughter Alice Hannah. Tom was a labourer and worked for Wardle council for 18 years before enlisting in Rochdale. 37 year old Private 34022 Tom Jackson, 6th Bn Leicester Regiment, formerly 12770 Lancashire Fusiliers was killed in action in France on Friday 22nd March 1918. The Rochdale Observer on 3rd August 1918 noted that tomorrow St Andrew’s Church would hold a Guild Anniversary service including a Memorial service for those Guild members who had fallen in the 4th year of the war. The Rochdale Observer for 27th April 1918 included thanks for expressions of and sentiments from his wife and daughter. The 1st May 1918 edition reported on a Memorial Service held on Sunday eve in St John’s church, Smallbridge. Tom is remembered on the Pozieres Memorial, St Andrew’s Memorial Card and War Memorial, St John’s, Smallbridge and Wardle War Memorials.

https://www.littleboroughshistory.org/march1918.html
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