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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2018 13:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

5 March 1917 | Centenary of WW1 in Orange

The Leader publishes a letter of thanks from Lance Corporal E Leslie Gillman in France to Joyce Agland of NSW to thank her for a Christmas parcel he received. He says: I feel I must write and thank somebody, so I do so to you…I rather like the name Joyce. ‘Tis a ripping name for a girl!… I shall be very delighted to hear from you it you care to write, and to hear all about you. I should also like to receive a photo from you.” He adds: “(I hope you don’t think I’m too cheeky!).”

William Edwin Agland, former Assistant Town Clerk in Orange, and the son of Orange mayor, WE Agland, writes from Lark Hill, England, to express his disgust at the “No” result in last October’s conscription referendum. He declares that those who oppose conscription: should be over here, up to their bellies in mud and slush and fighting for freedom, instead of waltzing up and down Summer-street, making eyes at the pretty girls.

http://www.centenaryww1orange.com.au/events/5-march-1917/
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2018 13:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Harry Coleman (Oct-Dec 1880-5 March 1917)

Harry was the son of William Thomas and Eliza Ellen Coleman (nee Logsdale) who married on 2 April 1866. Harry’s father was a Bricklayer who was born in Isleworth. His mother Eliza was born in Stanstead Abbey, Hertfordshire. William Coleman died in 1896 at the age of 56, leaving Eliza a widow. Harry was aged 16 at the time. The 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 Censuses all record Eliza working as a General Shopkeeper from her home in Isleworth.
William and Eliza had 9 children so Harry had 3 brothers and 5 sisters. They were Alice (born 1867), Bertha (born 1868), Eliza Ellen (born 1871), Ada (born 1873), William Thomas (born 1875), Grace (born 1878), Reginald (born 1883) and Edward Albert (born 1886). The family were living at 1 Wiltshire Cottages, Linkfield Lane, Isleworth in 1881, 1891 and 1901. Harry was aged 20 and his occupation was a plumber’s labourer by 1901.
In July 1909 Harry married Edith Euden in Brentford when he was aged 28. By 1911 Harry was working as a plumber and he and Edith were living at 30 Haliburton Road, St Margarets. Edith and Harry had a son, Reginald Henry Coleman, who was born in Brentford in April 1912.
In 1915 Harry and his family emigrated to Australia. The family settled in Victoria and their address was “Linkfield”, Thompson Street, South Oakleigh. However, in February 1916 Harry enlisted as a Private in the Australian infantry and came back to Europe to fight in the war. After training on Salisbury Plain he went with the 23rd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force (AIF) to the Somme in France in December 1916. In early 1917, between 9 February and 20 March, the Germans shortened their lines and withdrew to the Hindenberg Line (Operation Alberich). They adopted a “scorched earth” policy of polluting wells, digging up roads and laying mines as they moved. The Australian troops were ordered to advance to follow their retreat. Harry died on 5 March 1917 when he was shot by a German sniper. The Middlesex Chronicle reported that he had been buried in No Man’s Land. His service record describes his burial place as an isolated grave ¾ mile north west of Ligny Thilloy and 2 miles west south west of Baupaume. He is commemorated on the Australian National War Memorial at VilliersBretonneux, near Amiens in France.
Harry’s younger brother Edward joined the Royal Flying Corp in November 1915. He was in Squadron 5 which was equipped to carry out reconnaissance for the British Expeditionary Force. They specialised in acting as observers of artillery and taking aerial photographs in 2 seater biplanes over the battlefields of France. Edward died after a short illness in October 1918.
Both Harry and his brother Edward are remembered on the Isleworth War
Memorial.

http://www.isleworthww1.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Coleman-Harry.pdf
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2018 13:32    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The War Diaries of Roger Stamp: March 1917 | Stockton Heritage

Monday 5 March 1917 – This morning, March 5th 1917 was surprised on getting up to find a cover of snow.

http://heritage.stockton.gov.uk/people/march-1917/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2018 13:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letters from Tsar Nicholas to Tsaritsa Alexandra - March 1917

Telegram. Stavka. 5 March, 1917.
Hearty thanks. Mother kisses you and the children. She thinks much of Sunny. It is very cold. In the town it is apparently quieter. I hope that the invalids are feeling better. I kiss you tenderly.
NICKY.

Telegram. Stavka. 5 March, 1917.
Thanks for news. The old man knows nothing of his family. Could you not find out? In thought I am always with you and the children. God bless you! Sleep well. I kiss you tenderly.
NICKY.

http://www.alexanderpalace.org/letters/march17.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2018 13:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Lance Corporal HERBERT COLERIDGE WATSON - died 5 March 1917

Lance Corporal HERBERT COLERIDGE WATSON
Service No: R/21218
Age: 37
Regiment/Service: 1st King’s Royal Rifle Corps
Cemetery: ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY XXI. N. 3A.

Barrister of the Inner Temple, and Literary Critic on the staff of “The Daily Telegraph.”.

By profession a journalist, also a barrister of the Inner Temple (though not practising), he was on the staff of “The Daily Telegraph,” which journal “he loyally served” for about eight years; during the last five writing reviews of books for the Literary Sheet, besides contributing biographical notices to this paper. By nature a poet, and in all his tastes an artist, an ardent lover of music, literature and painting, he was able to express himself with ability and feeling through all these mediums. Of a sensitive and highly strung temperament, and not physically robust, a military career was the last that would naturally appeal to him. “Loving life and beauty,” as he wrote of Rupert Brooke, “he obeyed cheerfully, but not lightly, his country’s call to arms” in defence of righteousness and humanity, and like him “enjoying beauty so well” he was “not blind to the horror and ugliness of war.” But nevertheless, when the call came, he was ready like so many others to give up his work, to leave home, family, friends, and all his loved occupations, and to offer himself for the army. This he did, though thirty-five years of age (in 1915), on four occasions, but was rejected on account of defective vision.

In September, 1914, he had joined the “United Arts Volunteers” 1st Battalion, and remained in it for eighteen months, acting as platoon commander during the last thirteen. He passed highly technical examinations with distinction, attending- camp several times, commanded a company frequently in tactical exercises, and had practical experience in entrenching on the London Defences. He was recommended by his Commandant “as well fitted to hold a commission in the regular army.” He now again presented himself for enlistment, and was accepted. At this date, a new regulation by the War Office made it necessary for men over thirty-five years of age to serve for a certain time in the ranks, before obtaining a commission. Accordingly he joined the 7th Battalion of the “King’s Royal Rifle Corps” as a private, shortly being made Lance Corporal. He took an N.C.O’s course at Hertford, passing examinations with high marks, and also became a “marksman”. Later, another order from the War Office obliged men of that age to serve in the ranks abroad, before obtaining a commission. After remaining eight months in the K.R.R.C. he was ordered to France, and left England with a draft on Dec. 17th, 1916.

A last field card, dated February 16th, shews that he and his company are ordered to move forward again, as it proved, to join the advance on Grandcourt. After a “terrible journey” in the dark hours of the morning through the deep mud, “dragging bags of bombs, as well as the heavy kit,” himself falling repeatedly, he and his comrades come under shell fire, they fling themselves down in a shell crater, “but do not go low enough.” A shell bursts near them, killing six of their number, and wounding him severely. Around him “were exclamations from the others, and then all became very still.” These, and further tragic details, we learn from a little mud-stained diary found in his pocket after death. With what effort we shall never know his courage, and wonderful will-power enabled him to draw for us, a brief though graphic sketch of what he went through, while lying alone, wounded, “unable to move,” on the frozen ground, and surrounded by the dead. His last entry faintly written, breaks off on the third day, but alas! it was five days before he was found, and brought in by two officers, in a state of extreme exhaustion, with badly frost-bitten feet, and eventually taken to No. 26 Hospital, Etaples.

He died in his sleep

His cousin Oliver Cyril Spencer Watson VC DSO (7 September 1876 – 28 March 1918) was an English posthumous recipient of the Victoria Cross.

http://eyewitnesstours.com/lance-corporal-herbert-coleridge-watson-died-5-march-1917/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2018 13:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

John Patrick O'Neill

Slaughterman, born 1892, New Zealand
Tried: 11 August 1917, Rotorua Magistrate’s Court
Charge: Sedition
Sentence: 11 months’ imprisonment

The conscription system could be used as either carrot or stick in the complex game of forcing reluctant men into uniform, as the case of slaughterman John O’Neill illustrates. O’Neill’s card was pulled in the 5 March 1917 conscription ballot, but he failed to appear at the appointed time and place for military service and was placed on the wanted list. The Defence Department’s claim on him was, however, pre-empted when he was arrested with two other men in August 1917 for sounding off about the war in a Morrinsville pub. O’Neill was sentenced to 11 months in Kaingaroa Prison for sedition, though he served only till April 1918.

Defence reactivated O’Neill’s call-up on his release from prison, but he once again eluded the authorities and was classified as a deserter in May. Masterton police tracked him down on a farm in October 1918, and he was evidently given a choice between further gaol time and immediate enlistment in the NZEF. O’Neill enlisted ‘under grant’ and entered Trentham Camp on 4 November, perhaps realising that the war would soon be over. The influenza pandemic hit soon afterwards, however, and O’Neill was among the many afflicted. He died at the camp hospital on 20 November 1918, aged 27, and was interred in the soldiers’ section at Karori Cemetery under an official ‘war graves’ headstone.

https://nzhistory.govt.nz/media/photo/john-oneill-sedition
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2018 13:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

15. Landwehr-Division (Deutsches Kaiserreich)

Kriegsgliederung vom 5. März 1918
10. Landwehr-Infanterie-Brigade
- Landwehr-Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 12
- Landwehr-Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 53
- Landwehr-Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 55
- 1 . Eskadron/Husaren-Regiment „Fürst Blücher von Wahlstatt“ (Pommersches) Nr. 5
- Landwehr-Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr. 15
Pionier-Bataillon Nr. 415
Divisions-Nachrichten-Kommandeur Nr. 515

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/15._Landwehr-Division_(Deutsches_Kaiserreich)#Kriegsgliederung_vom_5._M%C3%A4rz_1918
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2018 13:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Kriegstagebuch 5. März 1916

Kriegstagebuch 1. Weltkrieg für Sonntag den 5. März 1916:

Afrikanische Fronten
Ostafrika – Smuts Kilimandscharo-Offensive beginnt: Stewarts 1. Division (4.000 Mann) rückt von Longido aus vor. Smuts verfügt über insgesamt 18.400 Mann (+ 9.000 in Garnisonen), 57 Kanonen (+9 in Garnisonen), 99 MGs (+25 in Garnisonen) und 4 Flugzeuge gegen 6.000 deutsche Soldaten mit 18 Kanonen und 37 MGs.

Lees verder op https://weltkrieg2.de/kriegstagebuch-5-maerz-1916/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2018 14:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Législation allemande pour le territoire belge occupé (textes officiels)

SIXIÈME SÉRIE - 3 Janvier 1916-31 Mars 1916 - (Nos 161-194)

http://heemkringopwijk.net/HOM-alg/WO_I/ext-pdf/06.pdf
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
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