Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

Nieuw ondergronds museum te Arras 'steengroeve Wellington'

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Musea en tips Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Regulus 1



Geregistreerd op: 17-7-2005
Berichten: 12476
Woonplaats: Jabbeke, Flanders - Home of the Marine Jagdgeschwader in WW I

BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Mrt 2008 13:29    Onderwerp: Nieuw ondergronds museum te Arras 'steengroeve Wellington' Reageer met quote

Alle uitleg kan je hier vinden :

http://www.lavoixdunord.fr/dossiers/region/wellington/

Hier kan je ook een filmpje bekijken

De diverse artikelen op zich :

http://www.lavoixdunord.fr/dossiers/region/wellington/080220-wellington-vue-de-l-autre-cote-du-globe.phtml

http://www.lavoixdunord.fr/dossiers/region/wellington/080215-weelington-un-memorial-pour-la-bataille-d-arras.phtml

http://www.lavoixdunord.fr/dossiers/region/wellington/wellington-l-attaque-du-9-avril-1917.phtml

http://www.lavoixdunord.fr/dossiers/region/wellington/carrieres-wellington-derniers-preparatifs-avant-inauguration.phtml


> Horaires : de 10 h à 12 h 30 et de 13 h 30 à 18 h, tous les jours, excepté le 1er janvier, les trois semaines après les vacances de Noël et le 25 décembre.

> Entrées : elles sont fixées à 6,50 et 2,70 euros (tarif réduit pour les enfants dès six ans et les étudiants). Des tarifs de groupes sont proposés (4,40 et 5,50 euros selon la période). Pas de réservations pour les particuliers.

> Mobilité réduite : on accède au site par un plan incliné adapté aux personnes en fauteuil, puis au souterrain par un ascenseur.
Des lés de bois couvrent le parcours dans la carrière.

> Groupes scolaires : le site propose des visites de groupes aux lycées, collèges et écoles (à partir du CM1), ainsi que des ateliers consacrés à la Première Guerre mondiale. Des circuits sur « Les champs de bataille de l’Artois » (parcs commémoratifs de Vimy, Notre-Dame-de-Lorette) ; « Sur les traces de la bataille d’Arras » ; « Les cimetières de la Grande Guerre, lieux de mémoire et de paix », sont aussi proposés au public scolaire. Réservations possibles dès maintenant.

> Carrière Wellington, rue Delétoile, 62000 Arras. Tél : 03 21 51 26 95. Fax : 03 21 71 07 34.

Site : http://www.ot-arras.fr
_________________
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/wiki/
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Regulus 1



Geregistreerd op: 17-7-2005
Berichten: 12476
Woonplaats: Jabbeke, Flanders - Home of the Marine Jagdgeschwader in WW I

BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Mrt 2008 13:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Meer engelstalig leesvoer :

http://www.nzlive.com/en/nzlivecom/the-carriere-wellington-museum

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/cavern-under-arras

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media_gallery/tid/1768

http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=105&sid=1346328

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/category/story.cfm?c_id=359&objectid=10492745
_________________
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/wiki/
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Regulus 1



Geregistreerd op: 17-7-2005
Berichten: 12476
Woonplaats: Jabbeke, Flanders - Home of the Marine Jagdgeschwader in WW I

BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Mrt 2008 20:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hmm, geen enkele reactie, ga ik op de duur toch nog moeten geloven dat het heel slecht gesteld is met de kennis van de Franse taal door de Nederlanders ! Embarassed Evil speechless Yvonne blik Wink
_________________
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/wiki/
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Mrt 2008 20:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik gooi er dan maar wat engels tegenaan, wie weet gaat dat beter Wink

Inside the amazing cave city that housed 25,000 Allied troops under German noses in WWI
By ROBERT HARDMAN - Last updated at 00:24am on 16th March 2008


The wax is still melted on to the chalk pillar which served as an Easter Sunday altar for the men of the Suffolk Regiment more than 90 years ago.

Old helmets are scattered around the floor. A heap of cans, including a tin of Turnwrights Toffee Delight, lies alongside a collection of old stone jars - flagons of rum, perhaps, to numb the fear of the battle ahead.

The word "Latrine" is still written above an arrow on a 30ft chalk pillar. Next to it, two large rusting buckets sit beneath wooden holes.

Further down the labyrinth, another arrow points up to "No 10 Exit".

Here a staircase hacked into the rock leads up to a tunnel and on through 60ft of chalk towards the outside world.

Today, the tunnel is blocked. In 1917, it led to fresh air and daylight. But it was also a stairway to hell.

And I feel extraordinarily privileged to be one of the few people to climb it without feeling the angel of death sitting on his shoulders.

After the best part of a century, a stupendous remnant of World War I can be unveiled to the world.

Here, beneath the northern French town of Arras, years of careful excavation have finally unveiled the secret city where 25,000 British and Commonwealth soldiers lived just yards beneath an unsuspecting enemy.

Canteens, chapels, power stations, a light railway and even a fully functioning hospital were all established in this chilly labyrinth where I am standing with freezing water dripping on my head.

Scarred by the devastating losses on the Somme in 1916, British generals came up with a new strategy ahead of their next major offensive at Arras in 1917.

A series of subterranean medieval quarries on the edge of the town would be linked by tunnels to create the most extensive underground network in British military history.

These were not narrow shafts for men on all fours to crawl along. Tunnels had to be wide enough for soldiers to march in one direction and pass stretcher parties coming the other way. The larger routes had to accommodate a supply railway as well.

Sweethearts: A drawing of a woman on a cave wall

Sweethearts: A drawing of a woman on a cave wall

It proved to be a mighty feat of engineering but, in the chaotic aftermath of war, it was simply forgotten and covered up. But that neglect is our gain.

Today, much of it remains exactly as it was on that extraordinary morning in 1917 when, at the given signal, several British divisions burst forth under the noses of the enemy.

By the end of one day, they had advanced further into enemy territory than the entire British Army had advanced in years.

And yet the subsequent Battle of Arras would still see the worst bloodshed of the war.

As far as the Great War is concerned, the Arras discovery is on a par with the discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb.

Next to a suburban supermarket, beneath a former camp site, the public can take a glass elevator from the 21st century straight down to the world of Tommy Atkins and bully beef.

Clever lighting and sound effects have created a mesmerising insight into life on the Western Front.

Accompanied by a bilingual expert and an excellent audioguide, parties of 20 are able to weave their way through an authentic slice of the Great War.
And I have been allowed an exclusive wander among the chiselled walkways, wells and troughs, the 91-year-old graffiti and wall etchings.

Who is that mysterious dark-haired sweetheart drawn on the wall next to the regimental cookhouse? Who carved an exquisite little crucifix into a pillar?

The trenches, the poppy, the Somme and Flanders' fields have become sacred elements of our national identity - and that of many other countries.

The received story is one of heroic failure and senseless slaughter. We do not associate the Great War with much brilliance and ingenuity. But that was not the case in Arras.

Hardman enters the tunnels through a manhole cover

The generals had learned a few lessons from the 1916 Battle of the Somme. Chief among them was the fact that frontal assaults on well-defended enemy trenches and artillery were mass suicide.

As the Western Front stalemate continued from the North Sea to the Swiss border, the French hatched a grand plan to win the war in 48 hours. They would smash through the German lines along the River Aisne in the spring of 1917.

The British would play their part with a colossal pre-emptive strike around Arras 50 miles to the north. A dazzling plan then took shape.

Today, Arras is an unremarkable town an hour's drive south of Calais. Most British tourists whizz past it on the autoroute as they drive to Paris and beyond. But if they look out of the window, they will glimpse some clues to the carnage in these parts.

Beautifully tended Commonwealth War Graves are dotted on either side. Soaring to the east is the stirring Canadian memorial to the 11,000 men who died in the heroic capture of Vimy Ridge. It is often said that Canada came of age as a nation that day.

Arras was a forlorn and battered frontier town. In 1914, it had been captured by the Germans, recaptured by the French and then put under British control to allow the French to concentrate elsewhere. In 1916, it was a shell of a place.

Civilians had been evacuated and British occupied the ruins while the Germans, who held the higher ground, sat to the East lobbing shells into the town.

It was just another stalemate situation on the Western Front. But, unseen by the Germans, something extraordinary was going on under the ground.

As an ancient town with Roman origins, Arras had an extensive network of cellars, tunnels and sewers - known as boves - running beneath it.

But the Royal Engineers had also learned that the countryside between the British and German positions was full of underground caves from where chalk had been quarried during the Middle Ages. Some were cathedral-sized caverns.

Sappers of the Royal Engineers decided that if they could link all these various subterranean holes in secret, an entire Army would be able to move safely from the rear to the front of the German positions and avoid all the initial horrors of the Somme.

Until then, tunnelling had merely been used by both sides to detonate explosives under enemy lines. Now, it would take on a very different purpose.

It was a hugely ambitious plan, but the 500 men of the New Zealand Tunnelling Company - all professional miners - set to work with a battalion of "Bantams", Yorkshire miners below the Army's minimum height of 5ft 3in.

In a matter of months, they had created two interconnected labyrinths, 12 miles long and capable of hiding 25,000 troops.

The tunnellers named this dark, damp kingdom after home towns. The southern part of the network became New Zealand. From one huge quarry called Auckland, soldiers could march through to Wellington, Nelson, Blenheim, Christchurch, Dunedin and so on.

The northern section linked Glasgow, Edinburgh, Crewe and London among others, plus a side-tunnel which led to a trio of quarries called Jersey, Guernsey and Alderney.

The Arras attack was set for Easter 1917 and, a week before, the generals started filling up their underground city.

It had to be done in total secrecy. Alain Jacques, the spirited boss of Arras's archaeology department, shows me how it happened.

"The soldiers could enter the network through a few cellars in the town and then walk for miles to their positions and wait there for days," he says.

He has an old photograph of the dilapidated bakery in the Place des Heros in the middle of Arras. Below it, two doorways have the letters "TOC" above them.

"This meant: 'To the Caves,'" says Alain.

"You can still see where they went in."

Sure enough, the bakery is in the same spot on this pretty square and doing a roaring trade. One of the basement doorways is exactly the same (these days it leads no further than a cellar).

It was an awesome feat of logistics. Imagine marching a Premiership football crowd beneath your local newsagent and keeping them there for days.

Each quarry housed a whole regiment and was really a maze of caves propped up by huge chalk pillars, each of which had its own number. The troops found their designated quarters by following the numbers.

There were strict orders on what should be in each cave - battalion headquarters in one, a sick bay in another, a kitchen area and so on.

Not far from Auckland, beneath what is now a manhole in the Rue St Quentin, the tunnellers built a whopping great 700-bed hospital, complete with operating theatres and a mortuary. It was christened Thompson's Cave after Colonel A. G. Thompson of the Royal Army Medical Corps.

In this disorientating, half-lit underworld, men waited for more than a week, playing cards, singing and writing heartbreaking letters which should be on every school curriculum.

Writing to his wife and baby son by candlelight, Private Harry Holland scribbled: "Kiss our Harry for me. When I see him again, it will take me all my time to catch him."

Private Holland never saw another sunset, let alone baby Harry.

There might have been freezing water dripping from the ceiling but, compared to the trenches, this was a cushy billet.

When the time came, at 5.30am on April 9, 1917, Easter Monday, the British Third Army marched down their exit tunnels, up their designated stairwells and out in to the open.

They found a bitter wind blowing sleet and rain in the faces of the enemy and a carefully timed artillery barrage blasting the enemy's positions-ahead of them.

The German guns, already hammered by their British counterparts, had little time to readjust their sights and bring fire down on an enemy which was suddenly a mile closer than anyone had expected.

There was heavy fighting, of course. Thousands of brave men, like Harry Holland, did not survive the day, but the losses were nothing like the Somme.

Germans surrendered bootless and still in night clothes. Up in the northern sector, around Vimy Ridge, the Canadians faced much stiffer opposition but they, too, had been helped by their own intricate tunnel arrangements leading up to the German lines.

Day One of the Battle of Arras was, without doubt, a great success. Within a couple of days, the Allies had advanced eight miles. By the woeful standards of that war, it was like capturing a continent.

In the weeks ahead, the battle would revert to the familiar pattern of epic slaughter for tiny gains.

There would be a murderous battle in the skies, too, as Baron von Richtofen and his Flying Circus arrived in the Arras sector, reducing the life expectancy of British pilots from three weeks to 17 hours.

The war would drag on. But the Arras tunnel network had done its job brilliantly.

Come Armistice, these tunnels were simply closed down and Arras was rebuilt. People wanted to forget it all.

During World War II, a few locals with long memories used them as secret air raid shelters and then, once again, the caves were sealed. And that is how they remained until 1990 when Alain Jacques decided to investigate.

"I could not understand why there was all this English writing on the pillars and signs to places such as Wellington,' he says, still thrilled at the recollection of his discovery.

"And then I worked out that these must be the tunnels of the Great War. We had no records of it, so I went to the archives of the Royal Engineers in Chatham and the Imperial War Museum, and it all became clear."

He had discovered the Blenheim quarry. Over the subsequent years, he would find much more. In 1994, a gas pipe repair led him to Thompson's Cave. Gradually, he worked out where the soldiers had emerged to meet the enemy.

His problem was that post-war Arras had simply expanded over the entire network and out into what had once been No Man's Land.

Much of the network has collapsed, much else is extremely unsafe and French laws meant that there could be no question of opening any museum underneath private homes.

Along with Arras's director of tourism, Jean-Marie Prestaux, Alain worked out that just one quarry - Wellington - had the potential for safe public access because it lay under a council-owned campsite.

Now, 18 years after Alain's first discovery, a £3 million visitor centre and a lift have been constructed. The Carriere Wellington, underground home of the Suffolk Regiment 91 years back, is, finally, open to the world.

"Everyone knows the Somme and Verdun," says Jean-Marie as he shows me round his beloved project.

"Now people from all over the world will learn of Arras. Even most French people know nothing of all this."

When I finally resurface, blinking and speechless, into the daylight, I ask Alain to show me where the inhabitants of Wellington would have emerged on that freezing dawn in 1917.

He takes me down several suburban streets, until we reach a crossroads on the Rue St Quentin.

"Here," he says, "this is where they came out to fight the enemy."

The scene could hardly be more poignant. Full of fun and laughter, it is a children's playground. Wherever he may be, I am sure poor Harry Holland would approve.

© en beeldmateriaal:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/worldnews.html?in_article_id=534236&in_page_id=1811
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Emiel



Geregistreerd op: 22-7-2005
Berichten: 6220

BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Mrt 2008 23:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Meer hierover:
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?p=205507#205507
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Arthur



Geregistreerd op: 14-2-2006
Berichten: 49
Woonplaats: Hengelo Ov

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2008 13:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Persbericht van het Frans Verkeersbureau

Sinds maart 2008 is Arras een uniek museum rijker. De Wellington steengroeve, een ondergronds gangenstelsel, dat, onder andere, diende als schuilplaats en strategische basis voor Britse soldaten tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog, is sinds 1 maart geopend voor publiek.

De steengroeve onder Arras, die is uitgehouwen in de Middeleeuwen, onderging een uitbreiding naar aanleiding van een offensief die door Franse en Britse militairen gepland was in de lente van 1917. Het offensief was bedoeld als afleidingsmanoeuvre en moest Duitse troepen aantrekken om zo een doorbraak van de vijandelijke linies tussen Soissons en Reims te vergemakkelijken. Tunnelgravers uit Nieuw-Zeeland hadden de taak om een netwerk van tunnels te creëren die onderdak kon bieden aan 24000 man. Tevens werd het ondergrondse gebied voorzien van douches, keukens en latrines. Dit gaf de Engelsen de mogelijkheid om in grote getale in een relatief veilige plek te verblijven terwijl ze zich slechts enkele meters van de Duitse loopgraven bevonden. Op 9 april 1917 om half zes ’s morgens deden de Engelsen een onverwachtse aanval op de Duisters, wat de geschiedenis inging als de ‘slag bij Arras’, één van de bloederigste slagen uit de Eerste Wereldoorlog.

Na een afdaling in een glazen lift tot ongeveer een diepte van 20 meter zal de bezoeker rondgeleid worden door de Wellington steengroeve. Tijdens deze ontdekkingstocht zal er meer verteld worden over, onder andere, de steengroeve in de Middeleeuwen, het werk van de tunnelgravers in 1916 en het doel en de strategie van het lenteoffensief in 1917. De plek biedt de bezoeker bovenal de kans een kijkje te nemen in het ondergrondse bestaan van de soldaten, wiens namen ter nagedachtenis in een herdenkingsteken gegraveerd staan. Na afloop zal er een film over de slag van Arras gedraaid worden.

Bezoek de Wellington steengroeve, een unieke en indrukwekkende plek ter nagedachtenis aan de slag van Arras. Kijk voor meer informatie en openingstijden op www.carriere-wellington.com.

Maison de la France
Tel. 0900-1122332 (€ 0,50/min.)
@: info.nl@franceguide.com
Internet: www.franceguide.com/nl www.ot-arras.fr
_________________
Een bijzonder boek? "Bijzondere ontmoetingen in Frankrijk" Zie www.ontmoetingeninfrankrijk.nl
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Stretcher B.



Geregistreerd op: 28-10-2006
Berichten: 1033
Woonplaats: Beverst

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2008 13:59    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

In WFA's BULLETIN 80 staat er ook een artikel .

Tunnel complex in Arras opens March 1st.

Wellington Quarry.

Hier wordt naar dezelfde website verwezen via [url]www.ot-arras.fr [/url]
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
hermie



Geregistreerd op: 12-8-2006
Berichten: 649
Woonplaats: Breda

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2008 14:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

hier staat ook wat beschreven:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Arras_(1917)
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
derwisj



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 7550
Woonplaats: aalst

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2008 20:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dan is het weer zo een modern museum? Was enkele jaren geleden ook ontgoocheld na de veranderingen aan de caverne du dragon aan de chemin des dames...vind het nu ook te proper...
pascal
_________________
http://www.feitelijkverenigd.be/wp-content/uploads/2005/08/banner-CTIDK-bovenaan.jpg
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
pifilsofimos



Geregistreerd op: 10-9-2007
Berichten: 669

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2009 18:51    Onderwerp: vernieuwde uitgave boek Arras Reageer met quote

Paar dagen geleden voor de tweede keer de Wellington carrière bezocht.
De eerste keer was voor de opening van de groeve met de immer enthousiaste Alain Jacques.
Nu 2 jaar later is het een didactisch erg interessante tocht van 50 min. Op schermen die in nissen verborgen zijn, krijg je inzicht in de rol van de Britten in Arras, het leven van de soldaten in en onder de grond.
Zeer toegankelijk, ook voor jongeren.

Daarnaast is er een tijdelijke tentoonstelling van en over de groep Durand met als thema 'the underground war' under Vimy


Een prachtig boek is het opnieuw uitgegeven boek 'Somewhere on the front' - Arras 14-18. Prachtige illustraties en kaarten. Mooie lay-out en op het eerste gezicht heel interessant. Weg erg duur 40 euro en nergens op het net te koop. Wel in Arras, Thiepval en Péronne.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
den Korrigann



Geregistreerd op: 19-11-2006
Berichten: 1110
Woonplaats: Roeselare

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2009 19:37    Onderwerp: Carrière Wellington Reageer met quote

Dit is niet echt mijn ding. Een rondleiding -ik was er bijna anderhalf uur- onder leiding van een gids én met zo'n moderne koptelefoon zijn aan mij niet besteed. Je kan je eigen tempo niet maken en om er te fotograferen -wat allesbehalve gemakkelijk is- heb je bijzonder weinig tijd wil je de uitleg van de gids niet missen. Didactisch is het wel en er is duidelijk een smak geld tegenaan gegooid, maar ik mis het tastbare. Je loopt er over een mooi verlicht hardhouten plankier zodat je niet met witte kalkvoeten buitenkomt. Een ballustrade zorgt ervoor dat je nergens de wanden kan aanraken om de vochtigheid en de kilte van de kalksteen vast te stellen.
Het onthaal, de tentoongestelde voorwerpen en de te koop aangeboden boeken vallen wel mee, ook de tentoonstelling rond de Durandgroep valt best te pruimen.
Gelukkig is Vimy er nog, voor wie zo'n tunnel écht wil ervaren...Een bezoek aan beide plaatsen lijkt me dan ook aangewezen, naar mijn bescheiden mening toch.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
derwisj



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 7550
Woonplaats: aalst

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2009 21:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

den korrigan, ik weet niet of het er nog is, maar als je echt zo een grot/tunnel wil ervaren moet je beneden aan vimy ridge zijn; je kent wel het museum in ablain st nazaire (denk ik...) wel als je vandaar verder rijdt richting duitse begraafplaats, juist over het volgende kruispunt, aan de linkerzijde heb je een ingang tot zo een grot vanwaar verscheidene tunnels vertrekken...toen ik er een jaar of tien geleden was kreeg ik een rondleiding door een oudere man...gewoon ik en hem alleen, allebei met een grote gaslamp op camping gaz...en de kerel maar anecdotes vertellen...over authentiek gesproken...
pascal
_________________
http://www.feitelijkverenigd.be/wp-content/uploads/2005/08/banner-CTIDK-bovenaan.jpg
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
pifilsofimos



Geregistreerd op: 10-9-2007
Berichten: 669

BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Aug 2009 20:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik kan begrijpen dat je dat zou willen, zelf exploreren en de muren betasten, alleen betekent dat dat de site binnen een paar jaar onherstelbaar beschadigd zal zijn. De graffiti en de tekeningen moeten op een speciale manier worden beschermd tegen temperatuurschommelingen enz.
Binnen de kortste keren hebben souvenirjagers stukken kalk mee of materiaal.
Persoonlijk vond ik de Nederlandse tekst goed ingesproken op de recorder. Het is dikwijls anders in Frankrijk of in Wallonië.
Het droevigste voorbeeld daarvan is het legermuseum in het Jubelpark. De Nederlandse teksten bij de tentoongestelde stukken zijn een echte schande. Of het zou de laatste twee jaar moeten zijn aangepast.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
den Korrigann



Geregistreerd op: 19-11-2006
Berichten: 1110
Woonplaats: Roeselare

BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Aug 2009 22:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

@Derwisj

Ook een Franse geweerkogel als afscheidsgeschenk gekregen ? Dat bezoek, ook al is het vele jaren geleden, koester ik nog steeds.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
derwisj



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 7550
Woonplaats: aalst

BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Aug 2009 22:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ja, ik moet die kogel ook nog ergens hebben...
pascal
_________________
http://www.feitelijkverenigd.be/wp-content/uploads/2005/08/banner-CTIDK-bovenaan.jpg
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
den Korrigann



Geregistreerd op: 19-11-2006
Berichten: 1110
Woonplaats: Roeselare

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2009 7:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

@pifilsofimos

Dergelijke toestanden zijn inderdaad hemeltergend en zijn, naast het veiligheidsaspect (lees verantwoordelijkheidsaspect) de hoofdreden voor het afsluiten van zovele heerlijk authentieke plaatsen :



Voor het inspreken van dat bandje werd een BV ingehuurd, zijn naam ontglipt me -ik ben niet thuis in dat wereldje van 'de boekskes'- en is inderdaad een opsteker voor de talrijke Vlamingen en Nederlanders die de streek bezoeken.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Eric '14-'18



Geregistreerd op: 19-11-2010
Berichten: 2460
Woonplaats: in een oude Hanzestad

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Jan 2016 13:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Afgelopen november met een maat van me dit museum bezocht. Nadat we eerst bij Vimy onder de grond waren gegaan wilden we dieper gaan.

Een mooie interessante rondleiding in eigen taal. Ook de gids/boekje wat ik kocht stond alles in vier talen (Frans, Engels, Duits, Nederlands), wat ik opvallend vond wat Nederlands betreft.
Leuk was dat je met een Tommy helm op ging de tour ging doen. Misschien voor sommige een overbodig detail, maar ik was al in de fun mood dus dan vind je dat zeker leuk.

Helaas kon ik thuis niks vinden in de boeken die ik al heb, of althans niet gevonden.

_________________
In a foreign field he lay. Lonely soldier, unknown grave. On his dying words he prays. Tell the world of Paschendale.
lyrics: Iron Maiden
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Musea en tips Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group