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Never-before-seen images of the mines dug by British

 
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2015 19:09    Onderwerp: Never-before-seen images of the mines dug by British Reageer met quote

Inside the real Birdsong tunnels: Never-before-seen images of the mines dug by British 'clay-kickers' under German lines in First World War.

[*]Mines were scene of underground fighting as portrayed in the Sebastian Faulks novel
[*]Excavations uncovered intact tunnels - and the bodies of four German soldiers



Flanders fields today bears little sign of the four years of war that claimed so many thousands of lives and ravaged this small corner of the Western Front.
But further down, deep below the surface there remains a constant reminder of the bravery and daring of the men who risked their lives for their country.
Beneath the farmers ploughs, most of the tunnels and dug-outs hewn from the earth by English pitmen to literally undermine the German offensive remain intact, untouched for almost 100 years.
They were also the scene of fierce hand-to-hand combat between diggers from both armies, as portrayed in the Sebastian Faulks novel Birdsong.

The British Tunnelling Companies were formed in the early months of the war to counter the German miners who were blowing British trenches from shallow underground workings.
Pitmen from mining communities in Wales and the north and the Ďclay-kickersí who built the London Underground and the Manchester sewers were recruited, some from infantry battalions others direct from civilian life.
Not only did, they offered vital support to the war effort, providing protected shelter for the troops.
By the time Armistice came the secret underground army had dug mile after mile of tunnel and hundreds of deep dug-outs designed to house headquarters, hospitals, stores and men.


These never seen before images of one of the tunnels were taken by British photographer Jeff Moore during an excavation with tunnelling engineer Johan Wanderwalle in 1997.
And the story behind the tunnel found by Mr Wanderwalle echoes the action in Birdsong, an adaptation of which is currently being screened by the BBC.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2092768/Never-seen-images-Birdsong-tunnels-dug-British-pit-workers-undermine-German-lines-First-World-War.html#ixzz3S1jwcncO
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Elias



Geregistreerd op: 14-9-2013
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2015 19:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Schitterend.

Zo'n dug-out als eerste onderzoeken moet toch iets weghebben van het
openen van een graftombe in Egypte...
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