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[90 jaar]Vigile 1914-1918 Vigil: A Project of Remembrance

 
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Okt 2008 7:41    Onderwerp: [90 jaar]Vigile 1914-1918 Vigil: A Project of Remembrance Reageer met quote

Vigile 1914-1918 Vigil: A Project of Remembrance
Published Monday October 27th, 2008
Unique act of remembrance names 68,000 Canadian war dead

From sunset to sunrise on November 4 until November 11, will project the names of the 68,000 Canadians, including New Brunswickers, who died in the First World War onto the Memorial Wall in the Alumni Memorial Building at the University of New Brunswick. The project is an initiative of noted actor and director RH Thomson, Martin Conboy, and Canada's National History Society.

The New Brunswick Provincial Capital Commission is facilitating New Brunswick's showing of Vigile 1914-1918 Vigil in partnership with the Province of New Brunswick, the University of New Brunswick, and Canadian Forces Base Gagetown; and its national partners, Veterans Affairs Canada and Canada's National History Society. Other viewing sites include Canada House in London, England, St. John's, Halifax, Ottawa, Toronto, Regina, and Edmonton.

During the Great War, approximately 27,000 New Brunswickers served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force. More than 2,400 died in active service; their remains — some identified and some not — are scattered on battlefields and buried in cemeteries in Europe. Their names are carved into monuments away and at home. Many of those who lived to return home suffered terribly: they had been gassed and physically and psychologically wounded.

"For those who were left behind, the Vigil is a way to bring them home," said Lee Ellen Pottie, Executive Director of the New Brunswick Provincial Capital Commission. "For all New Brunswick's war dead, the Vigil is a means to remember them, to honour them, and to contemplate their sacrifice and the sacrifice of their families."

The venue for New Brunswick's Vigil is the Alumni Memorial Building on the University of New Brunswick campus in Fredericton. It was built in 1955 to honour the university's students, faculty, and alumni who died during both world wars. Situated just below the Alumni Memorial Building is Memorial Hall which was built in 1924 in honour of the 35 UNB alumni who served and lost their lives during the First World War.

"UNB's participation in Canada's military is an important piece of New Brunswick's military history," said John McLaughlin, President of the University of New Brunswick. "It includes the officer training corps; the enlistment of students and faculty; Alexander College, formed to assist in educating demobilized soldiers after the Second World War; and the current Gregg Centre for the Study of War and Society, named after Brigadier Milton F. Gregg, VC, a Great War veteran."

The New Brunswick Provincial Capital Commission's mandate is to promote the history, culture and diversity of the capital region as a gateway to the rest of the province. In October 2007, the Capital Commission facilitated the designation of the Provincial Cenotaph, the only one in Canada, in Fredericton, New Brunswick's capital city.

For more information on the Vigil, please see http://www.1914-1918.ca
http://www.1914-1918.ca/vigil.aspx?lang=en
© http://miramichileader.canadaeast.com/news/article/460862
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Okt 2008 7:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Queen to appear at London launch of Canadian war vigil

Queen to appear at London launch of Canadian war vigil
Peter O'Neil, Europe Correspondent , Canwest News Service
Published: Monday, October 27, 2008

PARIS - Queen Elizabeth II will take part in a unique Canadian Remembrance Day ceremony in London next week to mark the 90th anniversary of the end of the First World War, Buckingham Palace announced Monday.

The Queen and Prince Philip will participate at an evening event Nov. 4 at Canada House, the Canadian High Commission building on Trafalgar Square. A huge projector will display in sequence, over seven straight evenings leading up to Remembrance Day on Nov. 11, the names of Canada's 68,000 war dead on the building's walls.

The same spectacle will begin several hours later as night falls in Canada, starting in Atlantic Canada and moving gradually from east to west.




The main Canadian display will be at the National War Memorial in Ottawa near Parliament Hill, although official vigils using the technology will also be held in Fredericton, Halifax, Toronto, Regina and Edmonton.

The project is the brainchild of Canadian actor R.H. Thomson and lighting designer Martin Conboy, and is intended to symbolically "repatriate" the bodies of the war dead who, by law, had to be buried in Europe.

Its other goal is to remember on an individual basis the dead who for 89 years have been remembered collectively during Remembrance Day ceremonies.

Thomson said he didn't expect when the project was launched that it would get the Queen's support, and he hopes the news will prompt schools, historical societies, community groups and Royal Canadian Legion branches to acquire the software to hold their own smaller-scale vigils.

He noted that the Queen was born in 1926, eight years after the end of a devastating four-year war.

"I'm actually quite cognizant of her interest of the men in that generation who died in the millions," Thomson, 61, told Canwest News Service.

"Her generation understands the size of that loss. Her generation gets it. Her father and her grandfathers must have talked a lot about it.

"My generation and the generation underneath me don't quite get it."

He said he often tells Canadian schoolchildren that their country's current military losses in Afghanistan, while tragic and relatively high compared to the casualty rate of other nations in that conflict, pale in comparison to the tragedy of the 1914-18 "war to end all wars."

The 68,000 dead, as a percentage of the Canadian population at the time, would equal close to 300,000 today, he noted.

Thomson said part of his inspiration comes from the letters written by his five great-uncles fought in that war. Four died as a result of the conflict, two in Europe and two in Canada, while the fifth was wounded.

Thomson said he tried for months to secure West Coast participation in hopes of having the vigil end on the walls of the B.C. Legislature in Victoria. But he said provincial officials balked at the $62,000 price tag.

"It's sad because Victoria would have been really important to have," he said, adding that British Columbians can watch the name display on the vigil website.

A spokesman for B.C. Tourism, Culture and the Arts Minister Bill Bennett said Monday that the ministry decided to pass on the project because it wanted to proceed with a soon-to-be announced collaboration with the BC Veterans Commemorative Association.

"The BC veterans project is a province-wide project that will reach everyone and not just be about our contribution to World War I but contributions everywhere," said spokesman David Greer.

No details about this project have been released, including if it will be considered the province's sole Remembrance Day celebration. Greer could not say if the province has planned any other festivities that day.

Veterans Affairs Canada contributed $340,000 to pay for the production of the National War Memorial vigil in Ottawa, the simultaneous webcast of the event, and the coordination of vigils in the other cities that were funded by local and private sector sources.

Canadians can look up the names of relatives who died during the war, and determine the exact moment when their names will be displayed during the live broadcast from Ottawa, by going to www.1914-1918.ca.

Community groups that want to take part in vigil activities in the cities involved, or acquire the projection software package for smaller vigils, can contact the Canada's National History Society at vigil www.historysociety.ca or go to www.historysociety.ca.


© Canwest News Service 2008
http://www.canada.com/topics/news/world/story.html?id=24b582da-7ecc-4fdd-9dbd-d8a3e26c569f
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BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Nov 2008 0:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Nu te volgen:
http://www.1914-1918.ca/vigil.aspx?lang=en
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BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Nov 2008 10:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Quote:
We went to the Vigil 1914-1918 last night. There wasn’t a ceremony leading up as I had thought there would be, but it was a worthwhile experience nonetheless. We arrived in time to take the kids to look at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and at the National War Memorial itself before the projection started. We didn’t know any of the names that were projected while we sat there but we did have time to speak about the sacrifices of the soldiers, about Dr John McCrae (writer of the poem In Flanders Fields), and the importance of remembrance. At supper we did the math: 68,000 Canadians died in the First World War; each name will be projected over 7 nights; each night lasts for 13 hours and the names are projected at the top of the memorial in pairs (they remain on the lower part of the memorial afterward as well). As you watch the pairs appear at approximately 8 second intervals, you get a sense of the massive loss of life, particularly since the total Canadian population according to the 1911 census was only 7.2 million.

The Vigil continues from dawn to dusk each night leading up to Remembrance Day and finishes at dawn on that day with the name of the soldier who died just 2 minutes before the Armistice went into effect at the 11th hour of the 11day of the 11th month in 1918.

© http://blog.reidelizabeth.ca/2008/11/07/vigil-1914-1918/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 15 Nov 2008 0:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

War memorial security questioned

Predawn dispute unsettles visitor at 1914-1918 Vigil
Andrew Thomson, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Thousands will gather today at the National War Memorial to remember the fallen. But an Ottawa man accosted while paying respects last weekend believes security during off-hours remains a problem -- even after a high-profile incident two years ago made national headlines.

Scott Fairbairn said he arrived downtown before sunrise on Sunday to watch his great-grandfather's name projected as part of the 90th anniversary of the First World War's armistice. For the past seven nights, the names of the more than 66,000 Canadians killed in the first war have been illuminated, two at a time, in the 1914-1918 Vigil.

Mr. Fairbairn was alone at 5:20 a.m., waiting to see the name of Pte. William W. Hall, a father of six from Peterborough who died in September 1916. Then two "burly, unkempt" men, carrying bottles in paper bags staggered toward the monument from the nearby ByWard Market, Mr. Fairbairn said.



The 45-year-old stood in the shadows to avoid being noticed and saw no security presence. But his camera flash betrayed him when his great-grandfather's name appeared on the stone facing and he tried to take a photograph.

The men approached and asked if he wanted company. Mr. Fairbairn said they became angry when he began to walk away. One moved in his direction, shouting and swearing.

There was no physical attack, but Mr. Fairbairn said he was shaking with anger by the time he reached his car 300 metres away. As well, "I felt very concerned for my safety," he recounted yesterday from his Riverside South home.

Even his mother in Newport, Virginia, watching the war memorial via the Internet, remembered seeing the two men on her monitor.

Mr. Fairbairn said he didn't see the point in calling police, but is concerned the war memorial wasn't being adequately protected.

"If you've got this vigil going all night then you've got to provide security, because people are coming to pay respects at all hours," Mr. Fairbairn said yesterday.

An outcry erupted in 2006 when Dr. Michel Pilon, a dentist and retired army major, photographed a drunken reveller urinating on the National War Memorial during Canada Day weekend.

In response, the federal government installed interpretive guides during tourist season and on holiday weekends to discourage disrespectful behaviour. This year, the student workers patrolled six hours a day, seven days a week, until Aug. 24. Commissionaires do occasional patrols until mid-November, and surveillance cameras focus on the memorial, according to spokesmen for Veterans Affairs.

Two technicians were on site every night to watch over the projection equipment and security was present during the day, said Martin Conboy, the lighting designer who created the vigil. Their reports have not detailed any incidents over the past week.

"I think it's very unfortunate," said Mr. Conboy, who planned to apologize to Mr. Fairbairn, but emphasized the vigil's success: the website -- http://1914-1918.ca/ -- had more than 150,000 name searches as of last Wednesday.


© The Ottawa Citizen 2008
http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/city/story.html?id=a2a04159-18f8-4419-b82f-f5278db28bae
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